search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROPOSALS


to RFPs, but improve outcomes, too. According to Eric McKinnon, senior


vice president at CerpassRX, “The fu- ture is in technology. Specifically RFP management solutions that are more of a business partner to organizations of all sizes. Being able to get every- thing stored in a single database or knowledge library while assigning RFP questions to subject matter experts and having them answer directly in the system is crucial.”


A Look at the Future of RFPs BEAU WYSONG


The request for proposal (RFP) process is broken. Whether you’re on the issuing side or responding side of the process, I think we can all agree it’s time for change. To help us understand how the process will evolve, a number of experts shared their views on the question: What does the future of RFPs look like, and how can you prepare?


After gathering and analyzing their answers, three main themes surfaced. Theme 1: Digital transformation


through RFP management tools will continue to evolve how RFPs are is- sued and answered. It’s no secret that the future of RFPs will rely on technology. Digital transformation is changing the world, and RFPs are no exception. In fact, a study by ISG found that, in the past 10 years, the time it takes to get from RFP to contract signing has been cut


down from 12 months to six. There has already been a significant shift from hard-copy submission to digital only – and that will only continue to increase. Just as businesses look to technol- ogy to streamline communication and sales technology, they will continue to adopt software solutions to improve RFP management. For example, centralized knowledge libraries and instant response selection powered by AI and machine learning will not only decrease the cost of responding


34 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2021 SELLING POWER © 2021 SELLING POWER. CALL 1-800-752-7355 FOR REPRINT PERMISSION.


While any technology that empow- ers RFP automation is better than nothing, some stand-alone solutions don’t take the bigger picture into consideration. Strategic sourcing- and proposal-only tools lack a holistic perspective that empowers true change. Without a centralized place where buyers and sellers can connect, transparency and visibility will con- tinue to be a challenge. A complete platform, built for both RFP issuers and respondents, improves the entire process. After all, better RFPs lead to better proposals, which lead to better partnerships – reducing costs and inefficiency for everyone. Theme 2: RFPs will become more


targeted, transparent, and strategic. The RFP process is detailed and complex. This works well for stra- tegic sourcing projects, but isn’t right for every situation. Relying too heavily on the RFP process can cause misunderstandings between buyers and vendors. Using the right procurement process improves transparency and sets expectations up front. With a multi-step procure- ment process leveraging vendor profiles, requests for information (RFIs), and requests for qualifica- tions (RFQs), everyone can achieve better results. Using these tools to gather information enables issuers to create RFPs that are short, clear, and to the point. Shorter, fewer, and more-strategic RFPs is a future we’d like to be a part of. David Kutcher, owner of Confluent Forms, comments on this trend: “I’ve been seeing organizations get really smart by using an advised, multi-


MONSTER ZTUDIO / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37