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a path to achieve it? While sales professionals are ac- countable for executing, the sales manager is account- able for articulating the vision and the path toward it.


QUESTIONS FOR SALES MANAGERS: 1) Do you assign goals and walk away, or give your people a map to success? Sales leaders cannot disappear until it’s time to measure results. They are responsible for arming the team with a plan and offering support as they execute. The best way to come up with a plan is to start with a desired outcome and reverse engineer. Choreo- graph the necessary steps and work processes.


2) Do your people have the right tools? Today’s sales pro- fessionals can and should have – at their fingertips – mo- bile, data-driven digital technologies wrapped in beautiful, seamless user experiences. At any given moment, anyone in the organization should be able to know whether he or she is measuring up to expectations.


3) Do you use measurement as a reason to punish, or an occasion to teach? Sales results never exist in isolation; they’re a product of a sales professional’s mindset, skill set, and tool set. When sales leaders treat the measurement process as a coaching opportunity instead of a courtroom trial, they elevate accountability from a source of fear into a process of affirmation and restoration of the salesper- son’s full capacities. Great leaders connect people with their inner magic. 


SELLING TIP A Little at a Time


Psychologists tell us that most people are much more apt to say yes to a new idea if it is presented to them a little at a time. But, if the entire matter is thrust at them in one big piece, they probably will turn it down fast. Publicists put this psychological quirk to practical use. So do teachers. Physicians apply it in healing mental dis- eases. It has dollar-and-cents value in selling, and many of us use it, perhaps without giving it conscious thought. Its importance was brought home to me again when my nephew, Buster, came to visit me over the holidays. My nephew wanted a dollar when we first met; he would put it in his bank. The idea was good. Built up by his approach, I bought. Later, he asked me for a dollar for another good reason: ice cream. And so on. He stayed for four days, and, after he left, I recovered from exhaustion and realized he had obtained $10 from


me. If he had asked me for $10 when we first met, I would have hung him from the nearest lamppost. But he did it step by step – every time presenting a need that was appealing and logical. What could I do but fill each one as it came along? Buster collected $10 from me, but he reminded me of the importance of that bit of practical psychology in selling: the successful salesperson uncovers the prospect’s needs and pictures them in such a personal, appealing way that the prospect can’t help but want to fill them. But, if the salesperson senses that the pros- pect can’t or won’t fill them all at one time, he concen- trates on the paramount one – taking care of the others gradually and in due time. To ask for the whole $10 at once is to gamble on all or nothing, with the odds usually on nothing. To ask for it a little at a time, with each appeal touching the pros- pect’s basic emotions, is to be almost certain of getting the whole thing.


– CHARLES TABER


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The key is to keep company only with people who uplift you, whose presence calls forth your best.


EPICTETUS


VIDEO: SAP CEO BILL MCDERMOTT ON CREATING A CULTURE OF MEASUREMENT


SELLING POWER AUGUST 2015 | 15 © 2015 SELLING POWER. CALL 1-800-752-7355 FOR REPRINT PERMISSION.


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