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BUSINESS NEWS


Mark Tanzer argues for a tax policy that ‘does not unfairly


penalise the industry’


Abta chief reiterates call for cut in passenger levy


APD ‘not likely’ to fall, despite climate pressure on airlines growing. Ian Taylor reports


Industry groups appear divided on how hard to press the government on Air Passenger Duty as the EU moves closer to imposing a carbon tax on flying. Abta chief executive Mark Tanzer


called again for a review of APD last week, arguing for a tax policy “that does not unfairly penalise the industry or place UK airlines at a disadvantage”. He was set to repeat the demand


at Abta’s Travel Maters conference on Wednesday, with the association


72 27 JUNE 2019


having led industry demands to cut APD since initiating the Fair Tax on Flying campaign in 2011. Yet Tourism Alliance director


Kurt Janson told a Westminster policy forum last week: “I don’t think we’re going to see a cut in APD any time soon.” Abta is a member of the Tourism


Alliance, the umbrella public affairs group for the outbound, inbound and domestic sectors. Te Treasury raised more than


£3.6 billion in APD in the 12 months travelweekly.co.uk


to March. Janson said: “It’s a large amount of money. I don’t think we’ll be able to claw it back. Te government needs the money and giving a tax break to something seen as a leading cause of climate change is something we’re not going to see.” Airlines UK, also a member of


the Tourism Alliance, echoed Abta’s call by demanding ministers set out “a clear road map to cuting and


Continued on page 70


BUSINESS NEWS


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