search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
DESTINATIONS


Pavedwith gold a


Laura French explores Rio de Janeiro’s best-kept secret: Paraty, the cobbled town once at the heart of the Brazilian gold rush


s I stand listening to the strum of a guitar faint in the distance, evening lights bouncing off the wet glossy


cobbles, I try to picture how this charming, now- touristic coastal town – Paraty, four hours’ drive from Rio – might have looked a century ago. At that time only 600 people remained, down


from 16,000 the century before. It had swung from boom to bust for more than


250 years, rising to fame as one of Brazil’s biggest ports during the 18th-century gold rush – when gold from the mines in Minas Gerais was transported here to be shipped to Portugal – and later as a hotspot for cachaca (white rum) and coffee. But when a railway direct from the valley to Rio was built, that all changed, leading to a mass exodus and cutting the town off for almost 90 years. It wasn’t until the 1970s, when a new highway connecting the north of the country to the south was built, that visitors from Brazil and farther afield started to flow back.


COLOURFUL HISTORY Today, its whitewashed colonial buildings and centuries-old churches – several of them built in Portuguese yellow stone, originally brought over by colonisers in exchange for gold – have been restored, framing narrow streets where horse-drawn carriages amble alongside artisans selling handmade baskets and other colourful crafts. The historic centre – listed as a Unesco World


Heritage Site – is pedestrianised, making strolls along its cobbles especially serene. Little bookstores, art studios and cachaca shops line its main alleys in rows of immaculate white, their door frames gleaming out in shocks of lemon and teal, blue and rose. Masonic symbols adorn several of its houses, harking back to the 18th century, when Freemasons came seeking liberal thought in this then-tiny fishing village. There’s plenty to see here, not least the colossal


First Church of Our Lady of the Remedies, which soars above the water with its whitewashed facade and ²


travelweekly.co.uk 5 SEPTEMBER 2019 87 BRAZIL | TIN AMERICA


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104