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DESTINATIONS SALZBURG | SHORT BREAKS next WHERE CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:


Getreidegasse; Museum der Moderne; pretzels; Salzburg’s old town; Mirabell Palace gardens; Residenz Palace; schnitzel; Sphaera in Kapitelplatz


PICTURES: Tourismus Salzburg/G Breitegger; Shutterstock; Österreich Werbung/Popp Hackner/Kristina Kulakova/ Catalin Georgescu/thecreatingclick.com


Bavarian Alps: Nip over the German border for some grade-A mountain scenery in the Königseeache valley. The half-day tour includes a trip to the salt mine at Berchtesgaden, where transport includes a ride on a little train and a mini cruise on an underground lake. Isango sells the trip for £49.


13.30: For lunch, Humboldt Stubn combines the traditional – dishes such as tafelspitz (veal or beef in broth) and beef goulash – with modern flair. There’s a big emphasis on organic, locally sourced produce and staff being paid fair wages, with little nods to alpine kitsch with felt cutlery pouches and placemats.


14.30: Take an amble along atmospheric Getreidegasse, which is becoming increasingly international, but is still home to some old-fashioned stores selling liqueurs, traditional costumes, hats and homemade umbrellas. It’s also home to two music-themed museums. Sound of Music World tries to tell the real story of the Von Trapp family, separating the truth from the reality-stretching inventions of the movie. Mozart’s Birthplace is devoted to Salzburg’s most famous son. The displays go into his life and works, and often bring in some


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quite surprising revelations. Mozart wasn’t just a natural genius – he was helped along considerably by pushy parents who had useful contacts.


17.00: Extend the walk by taking a look at some of Salzburg’s impressive public art projects. The most impressive of these is Sphaera – a man standing on a giant golden ball in Kapitelplatz – by Stephan Balkenhol.


18.30: The Augustiner Bräu is an extraordinary place for a drink. In the lower reaches of a monastery, beers are poured straight from the barrel into grey stone tankards, then consumed at communal tables in a vast network of wood-panelled halls. There’s also a beer garden in summer. Food is simple, classic fare – giant pretzels, cheeses, sausages and huge hunks of pork – but the setting is special.


20.00: If you’ve decided you prefer Mozart to the Trapp family, head back to the Mirabell Palace for a classical musical concert inside the Marble Hall, one of few rooms to survive the devastating fire in 1818. This is where young Wolfgang used to play himself, although the works performed now branch out to other composers.


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Lake District: A half-day bus tour around Salzburg’s neighbouring lakes and mountains takes in picturesque villages St Gilgen and St Wolfgang, with a boat cruise on Lake Wolfgang thrown in between April and October. Do Something Different sells it for £46.


FIND OUT MORE


E augustinerbier.at E domquartier.at E gasthofgoldgasse.at E hotel-4-jahreszeiten.at E humboldtstubn.at E mozarteum.at E salzburg-palace-concerts.com E soundofmusicworld.com E triangel-salzburg.co.at E villa-carlton.at


The ice cave: High on a mountainside above the town of Werfen is the Eisreisenwelt – supposedly the world’s largest accessible ice cave. Tours show off stalagmites, stalactites and flow formations, all covered in sparking blue-white ice. Viator sells a half-day trip for £70.


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