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DAY ONEi


10.00: Get a taste of how Salzburg became rich on the back of its salt mines with a visit to the Residenz Palace. The traditional home of Salzburg’s Prince-Archbishops, it’s brimming with world-class art, enormous tapestries and sprawling painted ceilings. The Residenz can be combined with Salzburg’s stylishly baroque cathedral on the DomQuartier walking route. This takes you into the upper reaches of the cathedral, where you can better admire the organ and the dark-grey stone that makes the cathedral look so distinctive.


12.45: Lunch at cafe-restaurant Triangel should give a sniff of Salzburg’s cultural side. The walls are full of black and white photos of the Salzburg Festival, and the menu serves up Austrian classics such as goulash and schnitzel.


62 5 MARCH 2020


14.00: Take the cute little funicular up to the Hohensalzburg Fortress, which is essentially a village in its own right. A version of it has been standing since the 11th century, and is now the largest fortress in central Europe. Among the courtyards and ramparts are a few moderately interesting museums on subjects such as marionettes and the Prince- Archbishops, but it’s worth saving time for a peaceful walk across the Mönchsberg hill. This combines fortifications, woods and city views, before arriving at the contemporary art-packed Museum der Moderne. A lift through the mountain takes you back to the old town.


19.00: For a pre-dinner cocktail, Little Grain at Getreidegasse 34 shows that Salzburg can do hip and stylish. Hidden in a cave-like underground space, bartenders can whip up concoctions on the spot if you tell them what you like.


20.00: The Gasthof Goldgasse is a hugely atmospheric restaurant with wooden beams and little nods to tradition. The biggest nod of all, however, is on the menu – several options are based on recipes from an 18th-century cookbook. The signature dish is fried chicken in a copper pot, although the suckling pig with roasted pork fillet in a herb crust is phenomenal if you truly want to pig out.


22.00: Retire on a happily full stomach to the Villa Carlton, a handsome building near the Salzach River that has a few quirky design touches to keep things interesting. These include model bulldogs under the reception desk, eclectic but brightly painted chairs on the terrace and black and white photographs of the city in the rooms. Doubles cost from £110. A cheaper alternative is the Hotel Vier Jahreszeiten, which is solid, central


and affordable, with rooms that feel warm and inviting rather than seeking to be cool. Expect to pay from £63 for a double.


DAY TWOi


09.00: Get ready for a substantial dose of cheese on a bus tour of the key filming locations from classic 1965 musical The Sound of Music. Available through Do Something Different for £47 (£23 for under- 12s), this starts outside the Mirabell Palace – home to the Do Re Mi fountain – and includes spots such as Nonnberg Abbey, the boating lake outside Leopoldskron, the Palace of Frohnburg (aka the Von Trapps’ house) and the gazebo at the Hellbrunn Palace. It finishes at Mondsee, in the Lake District, home of the church where Maria marries. Expect songs from the musical to be played on the bus all morning, with fellow passengers singing along.


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