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INTERIORS


95 Sustainability from the ground up


Catherine Helliker of Danfloor UK calls on product manufacturers to ensure they understand how they are impacting the environment, and increase their sense of social responsibility to their surroundings


roduct manufacturers’ philosophy should be to provide a sustainable business for future generations. This is why we should all be closely monitoring our environmental impact, and working towards producing high quality, sustainable flooring – i.e. created with minimal environmental impact. There are many elements and processes a manufacturer can look at to achieve this, including the use of renewable energy and carbon management. Below are just five ways they can develop products and processes that help work towards a more sustainable future.


P ISO 14001


This certification is based around the principles of prevention of pollution, the awareness of and compliance with all environmental legislation, and improving an organisation’s environmental performance.


In order to achieve ISO accreditation a company has to implement an Environmental Management System that monitors processes, and ensures an organisation:  minimises use of energy, water and natural resources


 minimises waste through prevention, re- use and recycling where possible


 disposes of waste safely and legally  avoids the use of hazardous materials, where practical


 works with environmentally responsible suppliers


 prevents environmental damage and minimise nuisance factors such as noise and air pollution.


Sustainable materials


Implementing sustainable material into products is another way of demonstrating a commitment to a more sustainable future. Sourcing the most sustainable and forward-thinking suppliers is key to achieving this.


ADF SEPTEMBER 2021 Joseph Rowntree Housing Trust, New Lodge, design by Diana Celella


For example, Econyl is a nylon fibre used for many textile products including carpets. The ‘regenerated’ nylon yarn produced by Aquafil performs exactly the same as ‘virgin’ nylon but has a very different story behind it. It’s made by recovering nylon waste such as fishing nets from the oceans, and turning it into high quality nylon.


Regenerated nylon gives endless possibilities and can be recycled infinitely. It is claimed to reduce the global impact of nylon by up to 80% compared with material produced from oil.


Carpets which incorporate wool are not only strong, static resistant, naturally fire retardant and pleasing to touch, but the wool fibres are also 100% natural, fully sustainable and biodegradable. Making wool another sustainable option for carpet manufacturers.


Product accreditation


Independent product accreditation is the key to provide specifiers and customers


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It’s estimated that energy savings of between 8-13% can be achieved with the installation of a carpet


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