search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
8 NEWS NEW APPOINTMENT


Sheila Bird Studio appoints senior designer


Sheila Bird Studio, a Manchester- based multi-disciplinary design studio specialising in brand, architecture and interior design, has expanded its team with the appointment of senior designer Georgia Ingleton. Georgia has over nine years’ experience within the design industry and has spent the past seven years working on a range of different hospitality and retail projects. She joins Sheila Bird from Manchester- based design studio, Phaus. The firm said that this latest appointment will help Sheila Bird Group continue to expand its portfolio of work, “advising landlords and developers on the spaces of tomorrow, as the north west begins to emerge from the pandemic.” Sheila Bird Studio added: “Georgia will work with the team to generate new concepts and design solutions for a wide variety of clients, including a new Italian restaurant and deli, as well as a new food hall in Manchester.”


EDUCATION


Hawkins\Brown’s Aston University centrepiece project approved


Hawkins\Brown has been awarded planning approval by Birmingham City Council for a 12,000 m2 building which will form the centrepiece of Aston University’s “refreshed” campus masterplan. The partly circular, 10-storey building will, said the architects, create a “high-quality landmark” as the university “refreshes its central Birmingham campus with a significant and impactful masterplan.”Hawkins\Brown were appointed to design the building following a competition in 2019, and the practice lead a consultant team that includes Price & Myers, Hoare Lea and Ridge & Partners. Aston University’s brief called for a building that would act as a destination to “draw people into the campus,” as well as capitalising on new and existing transport links as the university “reconsidered its connections to the surrounding city through the new masterplan.” The design includes a “civic plinth” at ground level with a landmark pavilion above. The plinth “addresses the surrounding campus and public realm,” and is wrapped in a colonnade formed of pigmented precast concrete, with full height


glazing that allows views into and out of the public-facing functions.


The upper pavilion is a glazed lantern


with a “dynamic, playful form that presents a distinctive silhouette within the skyline of Birmingham, particularly when lit at night,” said the architects. The sawtooth form of the pavilion facade is used to control heat gains into the building and facilitate natural ventilation, reducing energy use. Ground floor facilities include a museum-style cafe with associated social seating and relaxation spaces. A tiered lecture theatre is located at one end of the central ‘public arcade’ which includes a feature ‘performance stair’ providing a flexible area for social interaction. It will also double as an auditorium for evening lectures and presentations to the public. Mid-level floors contain flexible teaching


Images © Hawkins\Brown


spaces, and student and social study areas, while upper floors are dedicated to university staff and workspaces. An atrium rises through the height of the building, forming the primary circulation, and surrounded by “open, flexible” spaces for social learning. These benefit from natural ventilation, daylight and direct access to external roof terraces to “support sustainability and wellbeing.”


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK ADF SEPTEMBER 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108