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Images © Enrico Cano


apri, located in the Bay of Naples, is famous for its rugged landscape and the high-end hotels, bars and restaurants on offer – qualities that don’t traditionally dovetail with the creation of industrial buildings. It was inevitably a sensitive task, therefore, to design a small power station on a hillside near the marina on the island’s north coast. However it was one that didn’t faze Enrico Frigerio, architect and founder of Genoa-based practice Frigerio Design Group. The firm entered an international competition for the project run by Italian electricity grid operator Terna, attracted by the unique challenge. “The aspect that particularly interested


C ADF SEPTEMBER 2021


me was being able to give an architectural quality to an industrial plant,” Frigerio remarks. It wasn’t the first power station the studio had designed, having worked on two previously. He explains that the functional aspects and costs are understandably key drivers on such projects, and as such have to be carefully considered by the architects. In particular, he highlights “the relationship between what is to be built and the environment in which it will sit. In the case of Capri, the landscape was overwhelming!” The island had previously been powered by an old, privately-owned diesel power plant, which Frigerio explains was not environmentally-friendly, and often not


The need to ensure the power station wouldn’t detract from the


surrounding landscape was a key part of the brief


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