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4 NEWS


Managing Editor James Parker jparker@netmagmedia.co.uk


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FROM THE EDITOR


other factors, and the first phase is a 12-week consultation covering regulation of architects, and the role of the ARB.


T


While the MHCLG is wise to involve the industry, The ARB is in the meantime conducting its own consultation process with the profession, to develop a good practice scheme for architects as their role in refereeing design safety issues on projects comes into greater focus. The Government launched a ‘call for evidence’ in mid-August for both architects and “built environment professions” on the role of the organisation now and in the future, and the ARB is putting a reassuring face on its newly weaponised role under the Building Safety Bill. It will be able to kick architects off the register if they fail to meet new competence standards, so no doubt many architects will be putting many searching questions to the body during the consultation.


The ARB is stressing the positives in its new set of proposals – how they will “improve overall competence in the profession,” and it “won’t be about catching out individuals.” It also won’t be a one-size-fits-all approach, they say, but will be “tailored by architects to their own practice and needs.” The scheme will encourage architects to “reflect, plan, act and evaluate on their learning activities in a way that is relevant to their practice and development needs.”


The board reckons that raising the game on safety competence means a “proportional and deliverable” process, with its research showing that 70% of architects are “committed to carrying out dedicated CPD annually.” In addition, there will be a focus on avoiding duplication with existing schemes (and we have to hope that MHCLG’s review won’t get mixed up with ARB’s on that basis!).


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Welcoming the wide-ranging review by MCHLG, Niralee Casson, senior architect at Assael Architecture said that with Covid having shown how flexible, adaptable and resilient it could be, working from home also pointed to how accessibility into the profession could be increased. “Seeing diversity and inclusivity tabled alongside traditional architectural issues is a positive move to embedding these values within the profession from the outset.”


Alongside the stringent safety culture the Government is trying to usher in for designers, with the profession remaining generally ‘male and pale,’ diversity and inclusion is going to be the major issue of the coming years.


Perhaps the “renewed and modern” policy framework that the ARB is attempting to work towards should include some firm targets on such issues, as well as policing architects’ safety compliance.


James Parker Editor


09.21


ON THE COVER... Genoa-based Frigerio Design Group took a highly sensitive approach to the design of a new sustainable power station on Capri, to avoid spoiling the setting.


TERNA POWER STATION, CAPRI


How exploring the power of perforated facades helped a new renewables- friendly power station preserve the renowned holiday island’s beauty


BELLE VUE RETIREMENT VILLAGE, HAMPSTEAD Morris+Company makes the most of a tight site with intricate brick detailing


Cover image © Enrico Cano For the full report on this project, go to page 28


he Ministry of Housing has embarked on a review of the architecture profession, aimed at “modernising regulation, improving diversity and upholding the UK’s global reputation in architecture.” This is being driven by the post-Grenfell Building Safety Bill, as well as a range of


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ADF SEPTEMBER 2021


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