search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
60 EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


Architectural Powder Coatings – the facts about fire


external envelope of some of our high-rise dwellings where aluminium composite panels (ACM) containing flammable cores have been used. These panels are in the process of being removed and replaced to meet stringent new standards. Insurance companies, mortgage providers and other property stakeholders have also had their part to play to mitigate risk and have forced building owners to check for ACM and other issues such as areas of timber decking. All this will ensure a safer building stock for our city’s high-rise dwellings. The surface spread of flame on a high-rise dwelling can cause fire to spread quickly from floor to floor and legislation is now in place to ensure construction designs slow down the spread of a fire through the building envelope, or to stop it altogether, by correctly specifying the materials used in the building project. As a result, new and refurbished buildings deemed to be high-rise, over 18 m in England (11 m in Scotland), will be considerably safer. Of late members of QUALICOAT UK &


T


Ireland have seen a rising number of powder coating specifications that request an ‘A1’ classification for combustibility under BS EN 13501-1. When traced back through to the specifier, the origin of this requirement


here has been a great deal of discussion that has taken place of late over the combustibility of the


Anodised Aluminium Sheet - tested to BS 8414


largely stems from property stakeholders who are misguidedly attempting to mitigate their risk by exceeding the current guidance, standards and legislation currently available. This can add both complexity and costs to projects without any benefit or reduction of risk. When applied at standard industry thicknesses, architectural Polyester Powder Coating (PPC) achieves an ‘A2-s1,d0’ classification. This classification is required for compliance to the amended Building


Regulations 2010 (Approved Doc B: Fire Safety) Nov 2018 and accepted as providing the necessary protection from the surface spread of flame on high-rise construction and other legislated buildings. Ultimately, PPC does not promote


combustibility or fire spread when tested to BS EN 13501-1. This is further supported by the testing required for London Underground approval, often lauded as a barometer of fire safety. This requires compliance to EN 45545, where spread of flame is measured objectively (ISO 5658-2) unlike BS EN 13501-1 which involves visual assessment only. Furthermore, PPC smoke production is extremely low or non-existent (s1) with no flaming droplets (d0). On the chart of combustibility, ‘A2- s1,d0’ sits just under the ‘A1’ classification. It is important to assess the cladding


system holistically and not just the performance of the constituent parts under BS EN 13501-1. The predominant fire test for the


Pre-Coat Aluminium Sheet - tested to BS 8414


whole external cladding system is BS 8414. This provides a route to compliance for buildings over 18m that are outside the scope of Part B regulations. This requires materials to meet the performance criteria given in BRE report BR 135 which measures whether the cladding build up is deemed safe for buildings at elevated height. The test itself involves a 9m high wall with a complete cladding installation, including the fixing


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF SEPTEMBER 2021


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108