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102 INTERIORS


illuminate the space by night and act as a solar glare suppressor by day – eliminating screen glare for PC users. Here it was used to good effect at the Humanities building at University of Bristol. A lot of the rooms were subterranean, and utilised large light wells to introduce light into the spaces. The use of baffles allows hidden channels of electrical feeds to run across the glazed area whilst providing a veiling for the potential harsh light. The acoustic value of the baffles is also important where a glass ceiling is used, as glass alone will normally reflect sound.


Merrill Lynch Building, London


A vertical argument that stands up Thermal mass principles are exploited using vertical elements as they allow thermals to pass up and around them and heat or cool the building’s concrete structure. Unfortunately, flat acoustic panels will inhibit the optimum airflow in such buildings. When you then combine this with highly efficient and high output matching luminaires, the engineering design case is compelling.


An example of such a project was the Big Data Institute at Oxford University. Here the building was designed to be a highly efficient thermal mass structure, and a lighting/acoustic system was needed that was both elegant and extremely functional to contribute to the building’s thermal properties. The 7,500 m2


medical research


building, the university’s first BREEAM Outstanding building, was designed by Make Architects and can house over 550 people. It includes a concrete ‘labyrinth’ below ground which draws in exterior air, cooling or heating it using the thermal mass of the ground. Additionally, the thermal mass of the building itself is used as a sink to provide cooling throughout the day. Spectral’s Blade, a combined acoustic and lighting system, was chosen as it is specifically designed with thermal mass in mind. The project is one of the first to use the Blade II system, which allows for a continuous ribbon of light.


A vertical baffle arrangement assists thermal mass by allowing warm air to rise between the units and reach the concrete surfaces. The acoustic baffles reduce sound reverberation times; with so many exposed hard surfaces this would otherwise be overwhelming for staff.


Quartermile Q3 Fit Out, Edinburgh


Mike Attard is the UK managing director of RIDI Lighting Group


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK ADF SEPTEMBER 2021


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