search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Continued from page 33


starts. Mining should begin to grow with a focus on overall operating costs and per tonne of material.


Power generation has been also affected by shutdowns as demand for energy has been buoyed by home working but not to the same level as it was before. In future demand could come from lower carbon generators such as wind turbines, which will drive demand for synthetic products.


Primary metals are expected to see a moderate decline in demand between 2019 and 2024, also an increase in the adoption of predictive maintenance strategies that will help monitor lubricant life and reduce shutdowns.


The transportation industry has been particularly hard hit by COVID-19 with their suppliers in China shut down first and then their own plants in North America and Europeshutdown then their customers began working from home and finally a resultant decline in consumer demand due to the overall economic uncertainty.


The cement industry traditionally produces a lot of CO2


and especially in Europe they have been


challenged to reduce their own carbon footprint which could result in a move away from fossil fuels and a resultant increase in demand for synthetic fluids.


Coming out of COVID-19, it is expected that some consolidation in the market will occur from smaller participants running on lower cash reserves and lower equity as opposed to larger companies with larger equity who will emerge from this situation in a stronger position.


LINK


https://klinegroup.com/reports/general- industrial-oils-and-grease/


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53