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SECTOR FOCUS: AUTOMOTIVE PCEO


How the passenger car lubricants market is responding to changing conditions


Dr. Colin Morton, Senior Director for Consumer Lubricants, Lubrizol Corporation Dr. Ewan Delbridge, Director of Technology for Consumer Lubricants, Lubrizol Corporation


Passenger car technology is evolving rapidly in the drive toward lower emissions and more fuel-efficient powertrains. It remains vital to protect hardware with properly formulated lubricant solutions – and the complexity for the blender is higher than it has ever been.


Emissions reduction continues to be of major concern in countries around the world. With more than 1.2 billion passenger vehicles on the road, their role in creating greenhouse gases is being taken more seriously.


To those ends, a continued effort is required from formulators to satisfy the needs of evolving engine hardware. Balancing a range of new performance attributes with the lubricant’s ability to provide outstanding hardware protection is more complex than it has ever been. Combine these demands with a variety of challenging market conditions, and it can be difficult to see a clear path forward. This article will examine the current state of the passenger car lubricants market, what the future may hold, and what blenders can do to achieve success.


10 LUBE MAGAZINE NO.162 APRIL 2021


Satisfying the Demands of New Hardware Almost every facet of a vehicle design has changed in an effort to achieve greater fuel efficiencies and lower emissions. In the latest powertrain systems, it is commonplace to see advanced electrified designs that combine modern internal combustion engine hardware (petrol and diesel) with state-of-the art aftertreatment systems to manage emissions. Engine design today must also account for a variety of new challenges, including low speed pre-ignition (LSPI) mitigation, higher loads, a wider variety of operating temperatures, and the ability to accommodate


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