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Lube-Tech


consumer – we talk about a fuel saving of ~€100 compared to a risk of €1000 Euros if the oil is too thin and causes increased engine wear rates. However, the benefit of these oils accrues to the car manufacturers. If their vehicles can save 1-2% fuel by using a special fuel economy lubricant, then that OEM can drastically reduce the amount of fines they need to pay.


At the same time, the importance of “fuel efficient” lubricants for reducing Greenhouse Gas emissions is overhyped and more and more experts are turning to the life cycle analysis when discussing pros and cons of different technologies. Embodied CO2


cannot be


neglected: each new vehicle arrives with some 10 ton CO2


lifetime CO2


-eq., which is approx. 20-30% of vehicle’s emissions. By changing to fuel economy


oil, we can reduce the emissions by a few percent only. However, if by doing so, we shorten the vehicle life, we do more harm than good for the climate.


PUBLISHED BY LUBE: THE EUROPEAN LUBRICANTS INDUSTRY MAGAZINE


No.133 page 5


Hence, it is not surprising that all engine oils are required to meet certain performance specifications for wear protection. The standardised tests – such as Sequence IVB (ASTM D8350) – designed by ASTM and included in API/ILSAC performance specifications are carried out using a single “typical” engine deemed to be representative of current engine technology, in this case port fuel injected. However, currently nearly 75% of new vehicles are powered by GDI engines. Different engine designs produce dissimilar results and as a consequence, a large number of OEM-specific tests and approvals have been introduced, thereby complicating the lubricant development process.


Table 2 shows wear measurements for a 2.0L GDI EcoBoost engine carried out by SwRI® Radionuclide Tracer Testing (RATT®


using the ) technique. Testing was conducted using SAE 5W-30 and SAE 0W-16


Table 2: Engine Components with Measurable Wear during Different Engine Test Sequences


LUBE MAGAZINE NO.162 APRIL 2021


27


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