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NEWS


Goex goes west with new plant


US-based custom sheet extruder Goex has opened a new manufacturing facility in Cedar City, Utah. The 20-acre site will include a 120,000 sq ft facility that will employ up to 140 people. “Our new location


supports ourongoing commitment to ensure timely delivery of extruded sheet products,” said Joshua Gray, president and CEO of Goex. “Just as continued growth prompt- ed the need for additional space in [our main plant in] Janesville, Utah will help us better serve our customers in the west of the country.” Its Janesville facility employs 200 people. � www.goex.com


Trex offers recyclability testing to film users


US-based Trex, a leading manufacturer of wood-plas- tic composite decking, is offering free recyclability testing to users of plastic packaging.


By doing this, it hopes to sign up more partners to its NexTrex recycling pro- gramme – which sources used plastic film to use in its decking products. Each year, the company says it uses more than 400 million lbs (around 180,000 tonnes) of used plastic film in its products – which is made from 95% recycled material. Its main sources of raw material are retailers and makers of consumer- packaged goods. The testing process validates whether material is capable


of being recycled in the Trex recycling stream. “Trex invented composite decking more than 25 years ago as a way to reduce waste generated from plastic bags,” said Dave Heglas, senior director of material management at Trex. “We are one of the


largest recyclers of plastic film in North America.” Packaging designers,


producers, and brand owners submit a packaged product sample, and Trex will test it for free – and provide a report assessing three areas for acceptance: package/film recyclability; affect/risk of product contamination; and affect/ risk of non-recyclable


‘lookalike’ package contami- nation. This will allow adjustments to be made, in order to meet recyclability standards.


“Our testing program is intended to encourage more manufacturers to participate and take advantage of this ‘win-win’ scenario, while ensuring that the plastic we are collecting meets our high standards for production,” according to Heglas. Trex says that, as well as


providing competitive compensation for recycled materials, it works with its recycling partners to make the collection and transpor- tation of materials as easy as possible. � www.trex.com


Biodegradable compounding helps overcome plastic bag ban in Benin


A Benin-based blown film manufacturer has switched from polyethylene (PE) to biodegradable materials – in order to comply with a countrywide ban on conventional plastic bags. When the new law took


effect, Asahel Benin turned to Coperion for help. First, it ordered a laboratory-scale compounding system to develop a biodegradable compound formulation that could be used in its existing blown film manufacturing facilities. Before the com- plete system was delivered


8


to Benin, it was tested at Coperion’s lab in Stuttgart, Germany.


David Romaric Tinkou, development leader at Asahel Benin, received


training on the compound- ing machine’s operation from Coperion. “It was clear quite quickly


Asahel Benin is using a Coperion compounder to make biode- gradable compounds for use in its blown film plant


FILM & SHEET EXTRUSION | July/August 2019


that we needed a new business strategy to keep operating our blown film plants here in Benin,” he said. “Coperion delivered the necessary technology, and shared the necessary process engineering expertise with me so that we can manufacture biodegrad- able compounds ourselves in Benin.” � www.coperion.com


www.filmandsheet.com


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