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MATERIALS | STRETCH & SHRINK FILM


Right: RPC BPI Protec’s X-EnviroShrink contains 30% post-consumer recyclate (PCR) and is itself recyclable


The first resin, Encore, is a co-polyester that forms a versatile, clear shrink label that can be recycled with PET. The second, called Float, is also a co-polyester, and forms an opaque, low-density shrink label that floats in water and can be sepa- rated from PET in the recycling process. Thirdly, Sun Chemical SunLam de-seaming adhesive is replaces a traditional solvent seam, enabling labels made with Embrace resins to be removed in the wet recycling process. “With more recyclable options,


brands can feel confident in their ability to create engaging, attractive and sustainable packaging that meets the needs of any project,” said Kendra Harrold, marketing director for speciality plastics – packaging at Eastman. All three solutions are


recognised by the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR).


Shrink-wrap with PCR RPC BPI Protec has introduced a shrink-wrapped film with a high recycled content. Its X-EnviroShrink contains 30% post-consumer


recyclate (PCR) and is itself recyclable – bringing it in line with UK government proposals for plastic packaging. X-EnviroShrink, which is available in both plain and printed versions, uses the company’s Sustane recycled polymer to set a new standard in shrink film technology, it says. The product was developed after the company carried out research revealing that 83% of consum- ers were more likely to choose products with either less packaging or recyclable packaging – showing how sustainability is an increasingly important factor for them. “The sustainability of packaging is a paramount


SUPER G® HighSPEED™


requirement for brands and consumers,” said David Lumley, managing director. Available in both plain and printed versions,


X-EnviroShrink is appropriate for a variety of prod- ucts and markets, from beverage cans and bottles to canned food and cartons, said the company. RPC BPI has also made a “multi-million pound” investment in pallet stretch wrap, at its UK plant in Bridgwater.


The investment includes the installa- tion of seven new conversion machines for conventional and pre- stretched hand film. Once com- missioned, the new machin- ery will increase capacity at the site to 15,000 tonnes of cast machine film and 8,000 tonnes of hand film which in turn will create around 20 new jobs. The new conversion centre will enable the company to supply a complete range of pallet stability solutions from one manufacturing point.


Kurt Grazier, commercial director at RPC BPI’s


stretch films division, said: “We are committed to investing back into our facilities to ensure our product portfolio remains at the cutting edge. This project gives us an excellent platform for further product innovation and future capacity expansion.”


Energy saving RKW of Germany has developed a stretchable shrink film, which it says offers energy and material savings over competitive products. It says the film reduces energy consumption because it shrinks faster than conventional films, while cutting material requirements by more than 10%.


Shrink films are used to secure pallets during EXTRUSION SYSTEMS


ENERGY EFFICIENT (PP 6-7+ PPH/HP, 2.7-3.2+ KG/HR/HP) HIGH MACHINE THROUGHPUTS (2,500+ PPH, 1135 KG/HR) ULTRA COMPACT FOOTPRINT


SUPER-G® HighSPEED™


ULTRA HIGH REGRIND RECOVERY RATES (+80%) EXCELLENT MELT QUALITY AVAILABLE WITH ALL PTI ROLL STAND CONFIGURATIONS


extruders offer “High Density Manufacturing” solutions that yield high production outputs with small machinery footprints.


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