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CONVERTING AND BAGMAKING | MACHINERY


precision, ease of use, fast changeovers and simple maintenance, says the company – and was devel- oped to meet customer demands. “We extensively interviewed pouch converters,


gathered end-use pouch market data, and identi- fied critical unmet needs – all of which helped us create a stand-up pouch-making solution that answers converter concerns,” said Scott Fuller, product line manager for pouch and intermittent- motion equipment at CMD. The research phase of the CMD project identi- fied two areas of concern to converters: lengthy changeovers and extended maintenance. These two obstacles often lead to increased downtime, excess scrap, reduced production and lower profit margins. The 760-SUP has fast changeovers as standard.


It has easy splicing that does not affect downstream processes, quick change seal dies for fast access and turnaround, balanced rollers for consistent web control and a securely aligned zipper seal and guide-plate for accurate alignment. It also contains a step-in frame for safe, efficient adjustments and quick access. By cutting downtime with quick changeovers, the 760-SUP increases productivity and converters’ bottom lines.


Sack delivery


Windmöller & Hölscher recently delivered its 400th


Convertex machine – to a customer in India. The machine, used to make block bottom AD


Protex bags made of coated woven PP, was bought by Samarth Fablon in West Bengal. The company produces 120 bags per minute on the machine. Samarth Fablon is a large supplier of PP woven


sacks, supplying both PP and HDPE versions. It had first bought a W&H block bottom machine in 2009. Bishnu Agarwal, managing director of Samarth


Fablon, said: “Our W&H plant was running well – and we were very happy with the performance and the service – so decided to rely on W&H


Our Vision. Your Future.


equipment once again for our facility.” Now, the company runs seven W&H block


bottom converting machines, with a combined output of 500 block bottom bags per minute. “No other woven production facility has such a


versatile block-bottom converting configuration in India,” said W&H.


Another Indian customer, Kushal Plasto – which


also makes PP woven bags onConvertex machines – recently achieved its highest ever production in a single day.


At its Medchal plant, in southern India, the company made almost 150,000 AD ProTex block bottom bags on a single Convertex machine. Over the last 10 years, the output of this ma- chine model has risen from 60 bags/min to 140 bags/min. “The record production figure achieved by Kush- al also shows that Convertex is designed to perform consistently at top speeds,” said W&H.


CLICK ON THE LINKS FOR MORE INFORMATION: � www.starlinger.com � www.xlplastics.com � www.cmd-corp.com � www.wuh-machinery.com


Innovative Solutions for Plastics Recycling


Rising material costs and growing environmental awareness have made polymer recycling essential within the industry and calls for advanced technical solutions. Our answer to this challenge: BKG®


Underwater Pelletizing Systems.


Take your recycling process to the next level: Versatile system - one machine suitable for all polymers Optimized flow paths eliminating dead zones


Advanced die plate and cutter hub design - leading to the perfect pellet Enhanced dryer design reduces resin moisture significantly


WWW.NORDSONPOLYMERPROCESSING.COM Hall 9, Booth 9A44/48


Above: CMD’s 760-SUP has a step-in design for easy access and quick adjustements


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