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MACHINERY | DOWNSTREAM EQUIPMENT


blade at high speeds. The tube is cut with the spiral longitudinally as it passes through the centre of the cutting head. The pitch of the spiral is determined by adjusting the cutter blade rotation speed


relative to the extrusion line speed. Features and benefits include: Lenze


i700 multi-axis AC servo control for optimum speed and accuracy; faster blade speed for a larger spiral pitch range; full-colour 178mm (7in) touch-screen panel; twin direct drive servo motors powering the puller belts via planetary gearboxes; slide-away cutter head to


make in-line start-up easier; and a compact design.


Above: Gillard’s Servo-Torq Spiral-Cut can handle tube diameters from 3 to 60 mm


Optimised measurement Sikora says that its Ecocontrol processor systems – available in three models – help to control and optimise production processes. Ecocontrol processor systems are available with


Right: Sikora offers three separate Ecocontrol processor systems


22’, 15’ or 8.4in TFT screens. All models are characterised by their simple, intuitive touchscreen operation and a clearly arranged display. Recorded production data can be stored on the internal SSD hard disk or directly on a server. Production reports (time-, length- and batch- based) are also available for all Ecocontrol models. These are used in quality control – and in daily production – to document product quality over a defined period of time. The Ecocontrol series has all standard market interfaces, such as Fieldbus and OPC UA, to transfer measurement data. The devices are ideally suited for use in modern tube and pipe extrusion lines with increasing levels of automation, says Sikora.


As well as displaying and documenting meas-


ured data, the series offers its own automatic control with the Set Point module. Here, the processor system modifies the haul-off speed or


extruder speed to control to the nominal value of the wall thickness. The Ecocontrol models enable a higher degree of automation (especially for older extrusion lines) and raise process reliability.


Constant speed Bellaform says that its A 600 take-off ensures constant speeds for all types of extrusion line. The belts of the upper and lower carriages are


controlled by two separate direct drives, removing the need for toothed belts (which are maintenance- intensive). In addition, both carriages are movable, to ensure a stable centre and greater accuracy. The A 600 allows synchronous gap adjustment, for constant product centring. Extruded products are guided by side rollers, in which the roller spacing can be adjusted by a hand wheel on the roller guide.


It also allows quick opening: in the event of a malfunction, the lower and upper carriages return to their maximum gap positions. Product through- put is monitored by a counter wheel.


Pipe equipment US-based Conair has introduced a complete line of downstream pipe processing equipment and


PUBLISHING DECEMBER 2021


Contact: Paul Beckley – paul.beckley@ami.international or Claire Bishop – claire.bishop@ami.international to learn more about available promotional opportunities.


Bringing the plastics industry together


Produced by AMI’s expert consultancy and editorial team, this special publication looks at the fast developing chemical recycling sector. It will identify the key challenges and technologies and explore projects and players.


IMAGE: SIKORA


IMAGE: GILLARD


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