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MACHINERY | DOWNSTREAM EQUIPMENT


extrusion lines that are close to each other. Also, the servo-driven guillotines can perform angled cuts thanks to the rotation of the cutting group that is assembled on a metal plate. The smaller guillo- tine has a cutting section of 100 x 200mm, while the larger one has a cutting section of 200 x 300mm. In addition, Baruffaldi can customise the guillotine according to the specific customer requirements. Baruffaldi has also developed the iCut pipe


Above: The AllRounDia DualVision system from Pixargus has helped Uponor raise produc- tion of


composite pipes


in new inspection technology from Pixargus – its AllRounDia DualVision (DV) system. Pixargus says it is the first 360-degree inspection system for round products. It combines surface inspection and dimension measurement within one sensor head and shows the measured data in real time on the display. The first system has been in operation at Uponor in Zella-Mehlis for one year. Uponor uses the quality data to optimise the


production process. Process parameters can be analysed over time. In this way, Uponor can see whether certain machine settings lead to more or fewer defects – allowing it to refine its recipes. “The system can measure the diameter and


ovality, and inspect the complete surface area of round extruded products for a wide range of materials,” said Michael Frohn, sales manager at Pixargus. After the successful commissioning of the first


system, Uponor has ordered three more AllRounD- ia DV systems.


Cutting innovation Baruffaldi of Italy has developed a number of recently downstream innovations.


One is a double hot blade guillotine – in two sizes. Each can cut plastic profiles coming from two


cutting system, which has no planetary blade. The reduced size improves dynamics and enables short pipe lengths to be cut more quickly and without material removal – avoiding the production of dust. It also has low energy consumption. Further advantages include a reduced number of moving components – and less maintenance – as well as increased precision and flexibility. Baruffaldi has also conceived a palletiser that is equipped with a robot – with two rotational clamps that move vertically and horizontally. It takes cable ducts and rotates them by 180°, and deposits them in an orderly manner, says the company.


Cutting it Gillard of the UK has developed a new extrusion cutter called Servo-Torq Spiral-Cut. The new range of machines can handle tube diameters from 3 to 60 mm. It is typically used to cut semi-rigid plastics, including PE, PP and PA. The Spiral-Cut includes an Accra-Feed caterpillar infeeder and a Servo-Torq fly-knife cutter that cuts the finished tubes to length. A length cutter & a coiling head can be added if required. The machine is designed to cut a right- or


left-handed spiral along a length of plastic tube. It is typically used to cut cable-wrap and similar products. Options include blade lubrication and a pre-heater system (which is recommended for more rigid polymers or thicker walled tubes). The Spiral-Cut rotates a specially designed knife


SUCCESSFUL SOLUTIONS FOR YOUR DOWNSTREAM EQUIPMENT


Via Walter Tobagi, 13-15 | 48034 Fusignano RA T +39 0545 52652 | info@baruffaldi.eu


Baruffaldi Plastic Technology Srl info@baruffaldi.eu


baruffaldi.eu


IMAGE: PIXARGUS


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