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MACHINERY | DOWNSTREAM EQUIPMENT


Above: FB Balzanelli has updated its automatic coilers to accommodate larger pipe sizes


micro-duct lengths. Tube lengths that are con- tained in high-capacity barrels are much longer than those on a reel. Also, by laying the tube down in a loose fashion, micro-duct integrity is retained in a relaxed form. Octagon barrels are easy to stack and store


before being used in the subsequent assembly operation, while unwinding from octagon barrels is quite simple, says the company.


Coiling update FB Balzanelli of Italy has modified its range of automatic coilers for larger pipe sizes. The company says that installing pipe from a coil is simpler and faster for installers – because less welding is required. It says that its Excellence series of coilers – such as the TR3510PE and TR3515PE – add new features that add automation and make the equipment safer to operate. The coilers can be upgraded in steps and include two main elements: a round pipe system; and automatic strapping. The round pipe system features one haul-off on


Right: The Warp system from Inoex allows operators to adjust produc- tion to correct for excess material use


board that reduces ovalisation while optimising the coiling process. It adds several benefits during coiling, including: pipe control while securing to the reel; better control of ovalisation when coiling; and reducing the reel internal diameter, to give more compact coils that are easier to transport. Automatic strapping systems – with one or two


strapping heads – improve coiler performance, making it safer to operate. Strapping is performed automatically on large coils. Safer, faster strapping allows coiling stop time to be reduced. Where necessary, strapping time can be reduced by adding a second strapping head.


Radar measurement US-based Jet Stream – a manufacturer of construc- tion-grade pipe systems – is using a Warp radar


14 PIPE & PROFILE EXTRUSION | September 2021 www.pipeandprofile.com


system from Inoex to monitor pipe diameter. One of Jet Stream’s specialities is C900 PVC pipe for high pressure water distribution, in diameters of 4-24in – which must not be made out of specification. Before using a Warp system, Jet Stream did not have a good way to measure critical pipe attributes during production. Instead, it relied on inspection after pipe had been sawed to its final length. The C900 line is quite long – with two cooling tanks, a haul-off unit and sawing station after the vacuum tank. This means that a lot of material was already in process if a problem was detected in inspection. After Jet Stream installed a Warp unit after the vacuum tank it could see what was happening in the process in real time. The company can now see impending problems


immediately and adjust for them before non-con- forming product is produced. “We can also see how our process spread looks


relative to the tolerances – and adjust so we don’t give away all this free material,” said Paul England, assistant plant manager at Jet Stream. Jet Stream has also found that the measurement


data enables it to get start-ups producing good pipe more quickly. Initial projections on the payback time for the system were very accurate. Through material savings and reduced scrap, it is already paying for itself, said the company.


Faster measurement Pixargus says that its AllRounDia DualVision system has helped Uponor speed up production of composite pipes. When Uponor introduced new production technology for its OD 16 to 32mm composite pipes, production speed almost doubled. The inspection systems used in quality control were unable to cope with this. So, the company invested


FB BALZANELLI


IMAGE: INOEX


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