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HEAL ▶▶▶TH


Figure 1 - Percentage of surveyed chickens in each region receiving either the IBMass+ND (blue) or IBMass+IBVariant +ND (orange). Total number of chickens included in the survey per respective country is shown in brackets. University of Liverpool.


Africa 1 (32m chickens) 2012


2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019


100


Percentae Use (%) 50


0 50 100 100


Percentae Use (%) 50


0 50 100 100


Percentae Use (%) 50


0 50 IBMass+ND 100 100


Percentae Use (%) 50


0 50 IBMass+IBVariant+ND


that producers around the world have begun to adopt the combined IBMass+IBVariant+ND vaccination protocol. Pro- ducers from Eastern Europe started to apply the modified scheme in 2012, with producers from South America (2013), Central and South Asia (2015), East Asia and Africa (2017) starting later. By 2017, the majority of chickens surveyed were receiving the combined IBMass+IBVariant+ND vaccination, rather than IBMass+ND. By the end of 2019, it appeared that an increasing percentage of birds were being vaccinated with IBMass+IBVariant+ND compared to IBMass+ND (Figure 1).


Improved flock performance A producer’s decision on the selection of vaccine strains and the vaccination schedule is greatly influenced by flock perfor- mance. Though there are different strains of IBMass or IBVari- ant, our survey only included those using IBMass H120 or Ma5 plus IBVariant of 793B (either CR88, 4/91 or 1/96). Based on this limited study, several economic advantages were found in the countries surveyed (Figure 2). It was obvious that in some countries, the advantages of changing the vaccine


scheme had more of an impact, reflecting either the overall commercial farming technology, or know how and other con- straints in the respective country or region. Following the ap- plication of IBMass+IBVariant+ND, mortality rates reduced in all regions (0.06-7.5%), live weight at catch increased (6- 425 g/bird), and there was a reduction of 6-25g of feed intake per kilogram of body weight.


Better health and production According to evidence-based publications and survey results, the global vaccination practice of day-old broiler chicks has been shifting to co-vaccination with IBMass+IBVariant+ND. This practice is likely to continue to increase due to improved flock performance, more efficient administration of vaccines at a day-old in the hatchery, and the early and stronger (wid- er) induction of immunity. However, the efficacy of combined vaccination depends on the strain of live ND or IBMass or IB- Variant vaccines used, flock status and environmental condi- tions on the farm. Veterinarians should be consulted prior to implementing any vaccination changes.


Figure 2 - Improvements in flock performances as measured by live body weight at catching, feed intake per Kg of body weight and reduction in mortality. University of Liverpool.


Increase in live body weight at catching


450


400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0


30 25 20 15 10 5 0


Reduction in feed intake per kg live body weight


8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1% 0%


Reduction in mortality


100 100


Percentae Use (%) 50


0 50 100 100


Percentae Use (%) 50


0 50 100 Europe 1 (480m chickens)


Central Asia1 (42m chickens)


South Asia1 (182m chickens) South Asia2 (500m chickens)


South America 1 (101m chickens)


2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019


26


▶ POULTRY WORLD | No. 1, 2021


Grams (g)/bird


Grams (g)


Percentage (%)


Africa 1


Central Asia 1 East Asia 1 South Asia 1 South Asia 2 South America 1


Africa 1


Central Asia 1 East Asia 1 South Asia 1 South Asia 2 South America 1


Africa 1


Central Asia 1 East Asia 1 South Asia 1 South Asia 2 South America 1


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