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STAFF


orror fandom is especially exciting right now. Thanks to social media, the community is better able to express and articulate what they love about it – the fear, catharsis and, increasingly in recent years, representation. Every issue, I try to tackle another aspect of why horror is the most powerful, progressive form of entertainment media; it overturns rocks, challenges assumptions, and opens coffin lids that the rest of the world would rather nail shut. I write ad nauseam about the importance of representation, so I was eager to celebrate Jeff Barnaby’s new Native feature, Blood Quantum, for that reason. A zombie flick that takes place on a Canadian reservation where the Native residents are somehow immune to the undead condition promises (and delivers) equal parts satire and gore, but something I learned from that interview is that there is something much scarier than misrepresentation.


In our conversation, I asked Barnaby to tell me his thoughts on how First Nations people appear in horror movies, and he challenged me to help him think of some. I came up with a few, but they were too stereotypical: I thought of the Old Chief Woodenhead segment in Creepshow 2, The Green Inferno, Cannibal Holocaust, and the more recent Bone Tomahawk. For his part, Jeff talked about his fondness for Mary Lambert’s Pet Sematary and about how, even though there’s not a single Native character in the film or book, he appreciat- ed the acknowledgement of the Mi’kmaq land in Maine (a facet that was omitted in the 2019 remake, to his disappointment). We talked about Poltergeist, The Shining and 30 Days of Night, and how the narrative preoccupation with Native burial grounds doesn’t appear to warrant the inclusion of Native characters themselves, and I’ve found myself thinking about that ever since. But what really shook me were Barnaby’s words on how cinema’s foundational bearings are so inextricably linked to misrepresenting the Native experience, making it hard for him to know if his movie challenges an existing system of oppression or contributes to it.


I’m aware that I ruffled some feathers with my editorial last issue – privilege can be hard to recognize and it’s easy to feel personally attacked by the implication that your life might be less difficult than that of others. I get it – I see all manner of white women represented in film (sometimes positively, sometimes not so much), and I try not to take that for granted. But as Blood Quantum reminds us, privilege is not having to wonder if your traditions will be forcibly wiped out in a generation or two, or if your blood contains enough Native DNA to qualify as such in the eyes of the government. In this context, cinematic representation is critical to that culture’s survival. For Barnaby and other First Nations people, resistance isn’t just something that comes up when the government wants to build an inconvenient pipeline – for these populations, living is resistance and representation through art is a fundamental part of that.


This is why I’m pleased and proud to have covered the first Native Canadian horror film ever made in this issue. Barnaby believes Blood Quantum is the tip of a cinematic iceberg – that the genre we love is ripe and ready to tackle traditional Native storytelling through the voices who know it best. We have such sights to be shown. The revolution might not be televised, but we’d rather see it on the big screen anyway, drenched in blood.


PUBLISHER Rodrigo Gudiño


CONTRIBUTING EDITOR MONICA S. KUEBLER


ART DIRECTOR ANDREW WRIGHT


OPERATIONS MANAGER MARIAM BASTANI


FINANCIAL CONTROLLER MARCO PECOTA


INTERNS


SARAH GAROFALO LAURA HOKSTAD


MARKETING AND PROMOTIONS MANAGER JODY INFURNARI PH: 905-985-0430 E: jody@rue-morgue.com


EXECUTIVE EDITOR ANDREA SUBISSATI


MUSIC EDITOR AARON VON LUPTON


GAMES EDITOR EVAN MILLAR


STAFF WRITER sean plummer


HEAD ONLINE WRITER MICHAEL GINGOLD


SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER DAVE ALEXANDER


RUE MORGUE INTERNATIONAL FABIEN DELAGE (FRANCE) facebook.com/RueMorgueFrance Charlotte Stear (UK) facebook.com/RueMorgueUK MOANER T. LAWRENCE (GERMANY) facebook.com/RueMorgueGermany AARON SOTO (MEXICO) facebook.com/RueMorgueMexico


CONTRIBUTORS


BRENTON BENTZ BENOIT BLACK JOHN W. BOWEN JESSICA BUCK JAMES BURRELL PEDRO CABEZUELO BRYAN CHRISTOPHER PAUL CORUPE ALEX DELLER GABRIELLE FAUST CHRIS HAMMOND


KACI HANSEN JOEL HARLEY RICK HIPSON


LAST CHANCE LANCE JOE O’BRIEN


DEJAN OGNJANOVIC STACIE PONDER PAIGE REYNOLDS TRACY ROBINSON JEFF SZPIRGLAS ROCCO THOMPSON


RUE MORGUE #193 would not have been possible without the valuable assistance of Graham Humphreys, Olivia Ziel- inski, Josh Johnson, Maddi McGillvray and Al McMullan.


Cover art by Graham Humphreys Design by Andrew Wright


Rue Morgue magazine is published bi-monthly and accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photos, art or other materials. Freelance submis- sions accompanied by S.A.S.E. will be seriously considered and, if necessary, returned.


ANDREA SUBISSATI andrea@rue-morgue.com


ANDREA SUBISSAT ea@rue-morgue.co


R M 6


RUE MORGUE Magazine #193 ISSN 1481 – 1103 Agreement No. 40033764


Entire contents copyright MARRS MEDIA INC. 2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN CANADA.


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