search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
GRAHAM HUMPHREYS’ BEAUTIFULLY MACABRE PAINTINGS HAVE BROUGHT THE GENRE TO VIBRANT LIFE FOR THE PAST 40 YEARS. NOW A NEW BOOK, HUNG, DRAWN AND EXECUTED, BRINGS HIS LEGACY TOGETHER IN ONE MUCH-AWAITED VOLUME


BY DEJAN OGNJANOVIC


Y


ou may not recognize the name instantly, but you will most certainly remember a movie poster or book cover conceived and executed by Graham Humphreys: once seen, they’re hard to unsee, or forget. This British artist has been our beloved genre’s mainstay since the early 1980s, when he instantly drew attention to his unique style with original artwork for Sam Raimi’s The Evil Dead: no small achievement when the director himself had this to say about it, “Graham immediately understood the essence of our film and painted an image that ripped up the traditions and threw the movie right in your face.” Other poster gigs soon followed, ranging from now iconic films such as A Nightmare on Elm Street to the more divisive House of 1000 Corpses, and including recent indie classics The Editor and The Void. In each of these hand-painted artworks (Winsor & Newton’s Designers Gouache being his chosen medium) Humphreys proved adept at selecting cinema’s most memorable moments and imbuing them with vivid shapes and colours. In recent years his unmistakable hand is most often found on the covers of DVD and Blu-ray reissues, but also on the covers of books, including Un- dead Uprising: Haiti, Horror and the Zombie Complex (2016), Cult Cinema: An Arrow Video Companion (2016), Monsters to Die For! They Live! (2018) and Monsters to Die For! They Bite! (2019).


Humphreys’ art has been collected in a special edition book before, Drawing Blood: 30 Years of Horror Art (2015), but due to a limited print run


of only 500 copies, it soon became an out-of-print collector’s item which now sells for hundreds of dollars (if you can find it at all). Luckily, London’s Korero Press Ltd. has just published a new, reasonably priced, mass mar- ket compendium of Humphreys’ most memorable images, stressing his recent, horror-related work, titled Hung, Drawn and Executed: The Horror Art of Graham Humphreys. The vibrant colours of this beautiful luxury hard- cover do this artist’s imagery justice, with chapters showcasing his versa- tility: book covers, DVDs and Blu-rays, film posters, miscellaneous works, private commissions, and record covers. The book boasts two brief but intimate forewords, by Dacre Stoker, great-grandnephew of Bram Stoker, and Victoria Price, Vincent Price’s daughter and author of his biography. Es- pecially illuminating is Humphreys’ own substantial introduction, in which he deals with the origin of his career and offers a meticulously detailed step-by-step photo-essay covering the phases of his method from start to finish, using his design for The Boris Karloff Compendium (2019) as an example.


The publication of Hung, Drawn and Executed provides an important and accessible overview of this first-rate artist whose work is praised on the book’s covers by genre dignitaries such as Clive Barker, Mark Gatiss, Rich- ard Stanley, and Larry Fessenden. For us at Rue Morgue, who adore his work, this is also a perfect occasion to talk to the man about his rich and colourful career, which has kept the genre we love so alive all these years.


------------------------------


How is this book different from your first art- work collection, Drawing Blood: 30 Years of Horror Art?


The two books have completely different origins. Drawing Blood was the result of a random sug- gestion by a friend that I might consider appear- ing on the UK TV program Four Rooms. Entrants are invited to pitch a sale to four dealers, each in a different room (studio sets, of course); hence, Four Rooms. The items might be anything from music and film memorabilia to unique furniture or unusual antiques. Initially, it was thought I could bring something from my own collection of


weird curios, but I saw it as a chance to generate the money to publish a book and stage an exhi- bition of my work. I’d calculated a total sum of 20,000 GBP. I was prepared to sell two of my key illustrations, ‘Evil Dead II’ and ‘A Nightmare On Elm Street,’ knowing that they were both familiar to UK horror fans and poster collectors. While I didn’t expect them to sell for the sum I had in mind, I thought it worth a go; I had nothing to lose. As it happened, one of the dealers owned a publishing company and gallery. For a nominal sum of 1000 GBP, he’d own the two paintings, publish the book, and stage the exhibition... this was Drawing Blood.


Hung, Drawn and Executed was proposed by the publisher. We’d met at a number of genre events and it had always remained a possibility. A window had appeared in his schedule of pub- lications and I felt that enough work had been produced since the final submissions in Drawing Blood to merit a new volume. Producing the book was a swift process. I included some images from the first book for one simple reason: Draw- ing Blood was printed as a strictly limited gallery edition of 500, in a box with a signed print unique to the publication. This made it an expensive item by normal standards, and not my preferred outcome. However, Hung, Drawn and Executed


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64