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my choice of imagery. It’s not only the client I’m considering, it’s also the person that will be spending their money on the finished item. I have a duty to both, though I should add that I can’t always control the results. Client intervention of- ten frustrates the work – compromises are rarely pleasing to the eye. I find that providing covers for reissues allows me the freedom to explore imagery that was originally avoided (back to the spoilers question!). Some projects have to be dressed down, others require some license.


Do you have any preference in what you like to draw: classical horrors, or modern? Splat- ter or mood? Arty images (Bava, Argento) or trash (Troma)?


Regarding my personal relationship with a proj- ect, I enjoy all of the above. I am fortunate that my work provides me with variety. But if pushed, I take particular pleasure in painting images from classic horror... especially Universal Monsters, Hammer horror, and Vincent Price! If I am honest with myself, I suspect that deep down, I am im- posing these preferences on subjects that aren’t at all related.


R M 18


tell me about working with him? Richard has always been a gentleman; always considerate of the people he gathers for any giv- en project and generous with his time. He also listens and is open to suggestions. Our work on Hardware provided a learning curve for both of us (I hope that is fair to say). Richard is also very good at enthusing people and will talk at length about the most tangential matters, yet remain focused... bewildering at times! His appreciation of creativity extends in all directions. I feel his sincerity was his vulnerability, with regard to Dr. Moreau. Fortunately, the documentary about its making (Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley’s Island of Dr. Moreau, 2014), provides insight into the minds of some of those responsible for the debacle that followed. The Color Out of Space is the perfect comeback. I can’t wait to see more.


You collaborated with Richard Stanley, which is sadly not documented in this book. In par- ticular, I like your pre-production artworks for his doomed Dr. Moreau film. What can you


Is there anything you feel you have not yet done artistically?


My best work... but I’m not going to rush!


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