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allowed me to produce a book at a far more af- fordable price in a much bigger edition. The first book spanned more than 30 years of work (in which only the latter part was completely genre- based). The second book contains work from a shorter period, but is almost all genre. I complete- ly designed the first book (to the gallery’s spec- ifications), whereas my publisher designed the second (thus relieving me of many headaches).


What’s the key to representing a whole movie in a single image? Do you care about spoilers at all?


I certainly do care about spoilers! You can see in my first Nightmare on Elm Street poster, Freddy is a simple silhouette. But once he was exposed to moviegoers, I could offer the character a full reveal in the poster for A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy’s Revenge. New films are briefed according to what can be revealed, but reissue work (the majority of my Blu-Ray/DVD covers) contains already familiar images, so the need to restrain the imagery is less important. I watch each film three times, the first to under- stand the storyline and get an overall ‘feel,’ the second to identify the key narrative moments and most powerful images, the third to make my selection of screen grabs for reference.


While horror is usually associated with dark- ness and shadows, your artwork is unusually colourful and bright. You’ve even said that you avoid using black whenever possible. Why is that and what is the significance of colour in your work?


Colour is so evocative... I find it intoxicating. Although I understand the value of dark, muted images, I believe there is violent underlying co- lour to everything. I like to turn things inside out! The biggest drivers of my use of colour came in my formative years at art college: from seeing a major exhibition in London called ‘Light Fantas- tic,’ a collection of new hologram work and laser installations – the colours were unlike anything I’d seen before – and the UK punk rock scene during 1976 and 1977, which was full of vibrant colour, Day-Glo socks, coloured hair, and bright shirts. Bands like X-Ray Spex seemed to cele- brate colour. I found the music filled my head with colour... this is what I try to put on the paper.


How was your use of vivid colours influenced by Hammer and Roger Corman’s films? Or perhaps by other filmmakers known for it (Bava, Argento)?


Aside from punk rock, you have it in two! Ham- mer and Corman. The use of colour is thrilling. I have always viewed both punk and horror as kin. It’s no wonder some of those early punk bands took names from horror films... Siouxsie and the Banshees (Cry of the Banshee), The Damned (These Are the Damned). The early punk scene was obsessed with The Texas Chainsaw Mas- sacre!


R M 14


IM"ALTHOUGH I UNDERSTAND THE VALUE OF DARK, MUTED "


AGES, I BELIEVE THERE IS VIOLENT UNDERLYING COLOUR TO EVERYTHING. I LIKE TO TURN THINGS INSIDE OUT! – GRAHAM HUMPHREYS


All your paintings are created in the tradition of paint on paper. Why do you avoid digital art and prefer to work by hand? It’s not a conscious decision to avoid digital art, it’s just that I enjoy the physicality of paint on paper. It can be messy and random. Plus, I have a large collection of paintings to exhibit and sell.


What is the place of a painted image among contemporary posters, which are so often


digital compositions?


My logic tells me that I have a link to the past; a lineage if you like. This is not ego, but an obser- vation. The posters that influenced me as I grew from childhood to teenager, they were all hand painted. Even the bad ones had something of the artist’s personality; the brush marks, the urgen- cy, the craft. If I can retain something of that in my own work, then I have succeeded. If you look at the beautiful images created by Drew Struzan,


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