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A Thriller Noir BLOOD ON HER NAME


Starring Bethany Anne Lind, Will Patton and Elisabeth Röhm Directed by Matthew Pope


Written by Don M. Thompson and Matthew Pope Vertical Entertainment


OVERLOOKED, FORGOTTEN AND DISMISSED


THIS ISSUE: LANCE ADORES ANTHOLOGIES 8 Ways to DIE


DEATH BY VHS WWMM


After suffering nearly four hours of The Irishman and chain drinking Red Bulls, de- vouring deep dish pizzas, and blowing through six pairs of adult diapers, I decided to go back to my preferred movie-viewing format – the anthology! Death By VHS presents eight bite-sized films ostensibly viewed by a couple of urban degenerates on a tape rumoured to deliver a bigger bang than bath salts wrapped in peyote. What they get instead is some subpar film fodder involving vampires, zombies, Krampus, and the Lepus… brought to cinematic glory via bad wigs, cheap sets and subpar effects. If you don’t find yourself slipping into a coma before the end credits, you’ll be forced to witness a battle between Jesus Christ and the Easter Bunny, which unfortunately is not as good as it sounds on paper. Should you still decide to brave Death By VHS, be warned it may be the first anthology you watch whose title proves all too true. BODY COUNT: 19 BEST DEATH: Candy Cane Eye Skewer


Putting the Red in Redneck


HILLBILLY HORRORSHOW VOL. 1 MVD Visual


Next up is the admittedly lo-fi sounding Hillbilly Horrorshow Vol 1, but hold up, part- ner! This one’s hosted by hillbilly miscreants Bo, Cephus, and their sexy cousin Lulu, a white-trash trio who found a few movies at the side of the road while cruising for roadkill. Heavens to Betsy, these here outings are high-quality yarns with some eye-popping effects of the first order! Of particular interest is a tale that goes by the name of "Doppelganger," which features the kind of stop-motion skeletons seen in The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad and The Nest and would’ve made a pretty good feature film all by itself! I highly recommend this anthology, though if I had my druthers, I’d nix a few lame jokes from the drooling hosts. Other than that, I heartily encourage you to break out the moonshine, heat up the possum casserole, and let the Hillbillies do their thang! BODY COUNT: 11 BEST DEATH: Folks Devoured By Mutant Bees


A Monster Anthology


CREATURE FEATURE Brain Damage Films


There’s not much I ask from an anthology other than nervous babysitters, killer clowns, horny teenagers, sleazy swingers, zombies, witchcraft, scarecrows, haunted houses, werewolves, serial killers… and some gratuitous nudity for good measure. And that’s exactly what I got when I popped this little flick into my player; true to title, it manages to cram every single one of my must-have ingredients into five tight seg- ments. Filled with thrills, kills and plenty o’ blood spills, Creature Feature balances a solid storyline with a retro ’80s feel that is bound to please even the most jaded gorehound. Remember… you can pause between stories to grab a brew, order a pizza, or change those adult diapers! BODY COUNT: 19 BEST DEATH: Scarecrow Stabs a Stripper


LAST CHANCE LANCE R M 34 CINEMACABRE


Blood on Her Name begins quietly, in the moments immediately following a violent crime. There’s a dead man on the floor of an auto shop, a pool of blood slowly spreading out from under his battered head. There’s a large wrench next to the body. And there is shop owner Leigh (Bethany Anne Lind), shaking and staring at the man she just killed. It only gets worse for her from there, after guilt drives her to leave the body on the property rather than dis- pose of it.


So, right off the bat we know who killed the man, but we don’t know why. Writers Don Thompson and Matthew Pope ever-so-slowly reveal


the reasons over the course of the film, wisely avoid- ing flashbacks and narrative dumps, opting instead to let the story unfold organically as Leigh deals with the aftermath of her crime. She’s got an ex-husband in jail, a teenage son on probation, and an antagonistic relationship with her father, who also happens to be the town sheriff. Every decision Leigh makes leads to a greater unravelling of her life and the tension mounts as she tries to keep it all under control. She earns the audience’s sympathies from the outset, but it’s riveting to be kept wondering if she deserves them. Ultimately, Blood on Her Name hangs on Lind’s aston- ishing performance as the anti-hero.


This film is pure noir thriller, with all the themes and tropes of the “city crime” classics refreshingly trans- posed to a small rural town. It has Southern gothic stylings, full of working class people on the fringes who often find themselves in moral grey areas, try- ing to do the right thing but not always willing or able to get there. We see lives that are forever marred by litanies of bad choices, whether it’s those made by themselves or loved ones. The movie contemplates what gets passed down through our families, and how far people go to protect them; hopefully we’d all make better decisions than Leigh.


STACIE PONDER Bled Before Dawn AFTER MIDNIGHT


Starring Jeremy Gardner, Brea Grant and Henry Zebrowski Directed by Jeremy Gardner and Christian Stella Written by Jeremy Gardner Cranked Up


In Jeremy Gardner’s indie sensation The Battery, a world infested with zombies was merely the backdrop for a two-hander in which the details of survival were


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