search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
COVER STORY WINTER POWER: DO With winter closing in and the long nights beginning to appear, PPSPower’s Stephen Peal shares th


Whether you are an SME, homeowner or a giant corporation you can never be overprepared for a winter power failure.


In any season, downtime to a generator can be a costly inconvenience. In winter’s extreme circumstances, it can also be dangerous. In our industry we often see similar issues with backup power systems reoccurring, when often they are easily avoidable. Below are some of simple steps that can be taken to avoid downtime in the winter:


Don’t leave your generator sitting idle Like any power equipment, generators require routine maintenance to ensure they can perform to their highest specification. An idle generator can face a number of critical issues, so ensuring your standby generator unit is ready to perform when needed can save costly repercussions later down the line.


Use fresh fuel and replace regularly The leading cause of generator failure? Stale fuel. When fuel is left for long periods of time, particles can separate and an unsightly thick gunge can build up within the engine’s fuel filters, injectors and fuel pump. This can be prevented by running your generator every few weeks, especially over the winter season. It is also important to conduct regular fuel testing to make sure there is no water build-up from condensation in the fuel tank which can lead to bacteria. Running the unit for just 10-20 minutes on a regular basis is the most effective way of keeping fuel moving around the engine.


20 | TOMORROW’S FM


Fresh fuel is critically important to maintaining a healthy generator and adding a stabilizer to the fuel that has been sat for more than six months can help prolong the lifespan, making it much safer to use.


Oil checks Oil checks should be carried out regularly (at least once per week) and levels should be topped up when required. It is recommended that oil is sampled regularly and changed according to the testing results, to avoid clogging and build-ups inside the generator. Oil and oil filters come hand in hand, so when replacing your oil, you should be changing your filters, otherwise you are passing new oil through the grime built up by the previous batch. It is best to have a good supply of oil and filters in advance, always being prepared for the worst-case scenario.


Check your coolant Using antifreeze-coolant will prevent generators from overheating whilst in operation so monitoring the condition of coolant is critical. During winter it is essential to check the mix of the coolant solution (inhibitor to water) as it has the potential to freeze, this can result in the splitting of the radiator and/or cylinder block in extremely low temperatures.


Regularly replace air filters Air filters are crucial to the overall condition of generators, as they regulate the air quality throughout the whole unit. Air filters should be changed regularly to prevent the engine overcompensating for a blocked filter.


twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76