search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FEATURE


A HOLY GRAIL?


Allen Coldrake, Director of Technical Services at CCM UK, asks whether FMs need to look beyond traditional single technology roofing systems to leverage the benefits of multiple materials with a hybrid approach.


For many specifiers, the process of selecting a roofing system for a roof refurbishment is based on what they have used before, or the generic system type they are most comfortable with. Cost and performance are usually significant factors too, but there are also wider considerations, which can, in turn, contribute to a more cost effective and robust installation.


Fundamentally, all roof refurbishment specification should be about reducing risk, both during the project and throughout the service life of the installation. That includes avoiding the risk of safety issues and disruption, of costly project overruns and snagging issues, and of integrity issues or performance problems. Combining technologies to leverage the complementary benefits of proven materials, as CCM has with the bitumen/EPDM hybrid system, Resitrix, can address a wide range of specification risk while providing a simpler installation with reduced waste.


50 | TOMORROW’S FM


The issue with hot works For decades, bitumen systems have been the go-to durable and cost-effective solution for flat roofs in the UK and the latest range of systems offer advanced bitumen formulations. But the traditional method for installing a bitumen system is by using a hot torch to enable the membrane to adhere to the roof surface, and this usually involves two layers: an underlay and a capsheet. Installation teams are highly skilled and safety trained, but use of a naked flame on the roof of an occupied building – or even an unoccupied property asset – particularly in areas of high urban density, is not just a risk; it’s an unnecessary risk.


Much has been done to mitigate this risk. The National Federation of Roofing Contractors (NFRC) has issued Safe2Torch guidance, indicating the areas of a roof where it is permissible to use a naked flame and areas designated a ‘torch free zone’, where only a self-adhesive or mechanically fixed membrane should be used. But does


twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64