search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
RECYCLING & WASTE MANAGEMENT CURSE OF THE FATBERG Following a number of high-profile cases and subsequent media coverage, people are


becoming increasingly aware of congealed mass found in sewer systems. But more needs to be done to combat this expensive and environmentally damaging problem, says Alastair Anderson, Head of Sales at Filta Group Ltd.


Fatbergs form when fat and oil poured down the sink combines with non-flushable toilet waste, such as baby wipes, to create a congealed and hardened mass. They are part of a growing urban problem across the UK, as the sewage infrastructure struggles to cope with our changing habits – most notably the rise in eating out and our ‘throwaway’ culture.


Fat, oil and grease in liquid form may not appear to be harmful, but as it cools it congeals and hardens. It then sticks to the inner-lining of drainage pipes, restricting wastewater flow and causing pipes to block.


“It is a criminal offence under section 111 of the Water Industry Act


1991 to discharge into the sewers any matter which may interfere with the free flow of wastewater.”


There are approximately 200,000 sewer blockages throughout the UK every year, of which up to 75% are caused by fat, oil and grease. Clearing these blockages


costs millions of pounds a year, which is reflected in our customers’ bills. Businesses also risk blocking their own drainage systems, which results in extra costs being incurred in clean-up efforts. These fat blockages can result in sewer flooding, odour problems and the risk of rat infestations, both near and beyond your premises.


There are a number of legal requirements in place to help prevent fat, oil and grease entering drains and sewers – and failure to adhere to these can lead to enforcement and prosecution, which can mean substantial fines or even imprisonment.


For example, it is a criminal offence under section 111 of the Water Industry Act 1991 to discharge into the sewers any matter which may interfere with the free flow of wastewater. And where the water company has incurred costs in dealing with the detrimental effects on the sewers – for example, removing blockages, cleaning sewers, investigating and remedying flooding or pollution incidents – it can take legal action to recover these costs.


Whether it’s hotels, leisure centres, office blocks or schools, any occupiers within a building that operates a commercial kitchen must be educated in the importance of keeping drains clear, and correctly disposing of fat, oil, grease and food waste.


46 | TOMORROW’S FM


twitter.com/TomorrowsFM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64