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HEADLINE HITTERS A THIRD OF UK BUSINESSES SUFFER VIDEO CONFERENCE CRASH DURING CRISIS


working, whilst 38% said they were continuing to enable digital skills training via video link.


Sridhar Iyengar, MD at Zoho Europe commented: “The sudden shift to complete remote working will be a shock to the majority of businesses and their employees. With the Covid-19 crisis causing chaos, disrupting supply chains and forcing millions into isolation, it’s critical that companies can continue to operate as efficiently as possible, to safeguard jobs and protect livelihoods.


Just under one third of UK businesses (31%) say their video conferencing system has crashed during a critical meeting since the Covid-19 outbreak, according to a new poll.


The polling of 200 businesses decision-makers in UK SMEs is part of a 1,500-word report entitled Covid-19: Isolation Nation, from the Parliament Street think tank.


The data also found that one quarter of UK bosses (27%) have failed to address their staff via video conference directly to update them


on the implications of the Covid-19 crisis. The polling found that two in 10 companies have struggled with managing their payroll remotely, with 21% expecting delays to salary payments this month.


In terms of IT resources, 58% of companies have ordered in new laptops, tablet computers and mobiles to manage 100% remote working. Crucially, one third (33%) have done so without upgrading their security systems. Around 34% said they had hired in external IT support to cope with the surge in remote


“For this to happen, businesses need instant access to the latest video conference applications, as well as project management and employee collaboration tools to help employees remain productive during this challenging time. Not only that, but they need to have a culture of trust and understanding with their employees, in order to have them work from home effectively.


“As the country pulls together, it’s essential that IT systems are correctly deployed to ease the burden on workers, who more often than not are trying to juggle working from home whilst caring for family members, neighbours and loved ones,” he concluded.


INTERIOR LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY SEEKS GOVERNMENT HELP


Plants@work has joined the likes of the HTA (Horticultural Trade Association) and BALI (British Association of Landscape Industries) in sending a letter to the government requesting consideration for a rescue package.


The letter is asking for additional funds to be put aside by the UK government for an interior landscaping plants scrappage scheme.


Plants@work Chair, Madeleine Evans of Tivoli Services, explained: “Some of our members have expressed concern about the probable loss of plants following the lock down especially as there is no


www.tomorrowsfm.com


specified time for this situation. With many members not having access to client’s buildings to maintain installations, the biggest fear is that the cost of replacing plants could put their companies at considerable risk of discontinuing to trade.”


Plants@work has written to Rishi Sunak, Chancellor of the Exchequer, Elizabeth Truss, Minister for Industry, Trade and Investment and Robert Jenrick, Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government and has also sent a letter to Nicholas Saphir who has just been appointed as Chair of the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB).


TOMORROW’S FM | 07


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