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“Your customers


are unlikely to get a good service if the


technician is rushing around and just


changing bait boxes.”


Picking the pest option


Julia Pittman, Director of Beaverpest Pest Control, offers up some advice on how to choose a good pest control sub-contractor.


Looking for a pest control company through Google will produce pages and pages of results. These days even the newest, smallest company can produce a professional- looking website.


Using the British Pest Control Association (BPCA) website’s ‘Find a Member’ service will help to ensure minimum standards, but what else should you consider? I suggest considering the following:


1. Their willingness to go the extra mile


What’s the company culture like? Is willingness to go the extra mile embedded into their culture? Is it a normal part of their daily routine?


When you speak to the subcontractor, are they helpful and informative? Do you get to speak to an answering service or someone that can actually help you?


If the culture to go the extra mile for the customer isn’t embedded into the frontline technicians, then they are more likely to carry out a surface inspection without really getting to the bottom of the problem. And that means your customers’ issue doesn’t get resolved which reflects on you and your cleaning contracts.


2. They treat their employees well


We hear about pest control technicians working 10 to 12- hour days on a regular basis to try and keep up with their routine calls. Your customers are unlikely to get a good service if the technician is rushing around and just changing bait boxes.


Let’s face it, the service is dependent on the technician that is provided. Do they have regular technicians? Do they know the premises and the problems that your customers have?


3. Knowledge


As well as having enough time, do they have the skills? Do they undergo regular training?


Pest Control regulations and product labels change on a regular basis so your company/technician needs to be up to date with the latest rules and regulations.


Do they belong to a CPD scheme, either the new BPCA registered scheme or BASIS PROMPT? These schemes show that technicians are continually improving their knowledge and skills.


4. Great back office support


No matter how good the technicians are, you will need to speak to someone in the office. The technicians and back office should work seamlessly together with information between the front line and the office easily available.


Can you get reports easily? Have you been allocated an account manager? Can the subcontractor’s office deal with any questions that you have for them and do they actually resolve your issues easily? Do you get a speedy response?


Careful selection will pay dividends in service levels. After all, pest control is a knowledge-based service industry and with the tightening up of legislation, these areas will only increase in importance.


5. Pricing


Finally, can you add your margins to their pricing? Do they understand what is important to you as a cleaning company? Does their service generate lots of complaints or create lots of admin for your teams? If so, then maybe you have chosen a pest control company which doesn’t really understand the cleaning sector.


www.pestcontrolservices.co.uk 74 | SPECIALIST CLEANING


(https://bpca.org.uk/find-a-pest-controller/check-a-member) (https://bpca.org.uk/Individual-Recognition)


twitter.com/TomoCleaning


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