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SMOOTH Here, Bostik underlines the importance of choos


The stage preceding the application of a floorcovering can sometimes be overlooked, but subfloor preparation is critical to the process of installing a floor. When it comes to getting the substrate ready to receive the floorcovering, specific knowledge of the subfloor is highly important, as is access to the right products for the particular application.


MANAGING MOISTURE When the subfloor is found to be damp (above 75% RH), we would always advise that a surface damp proof membrane (DPM) is used prior to the application of the smoothing compound, unless the floor can be left long enough to dry naturally. As time is limited on most sites, a surface applied DPM is normally specified, with our Screedmaster One Coat Membrane being a common option.


GETTING DEEPER When floor levels need raising, applying a layer of smoothing compound thicker than the standard 2mm to 10mm can pose a problem for some products. Our Screedmaster Deep is the ideal solution, as it can be applied between 5mm and 50mm in a single step. It can also withstand foot traffic in as little as 90 minutes, meaning project timescales are not compromised.


When a thicker application of smoothing compound is required, there will be an increase in tension on the subfloor as the product cures and dries. In this situation, a tenacious bonding primer that’s compatible with the DPM should be used. Screedmaster Epoxy Primer offers the ideal solution, by enhancing the bond of the deep fill compound to the subfloor.


GOING WITH THE FLOW Our Screedmaster Flow smoothing compound is a two-part, cementitious underlayment that has improved flow and workability to help smooth rough textured subfloors.


The easy trowelling compound can be used over most common substrates including concrete, sand/cement, stone, anhydrite screeds, terrazzo and quarry tiles, as well as asphalt and other strong, rigid subfloors.


It also has a low odour formulation, which makes it ideal for use in occupied buildings that are going through a refurbishment process.


Our high performance Screedmaster Ultimate offers similar benefits to Screedmaster Flow in terms of workability and flow characteristics, and can be used to smooth rough textured subfloors prior to the application of a damp-proof membrane (DPM).


TIPS FOR THE SUMMER As we enter the warmer months, it’s worth remembering that hotter conditions often mean drying times for smoothing compounds can speed up significantly. There are a couple of things worth keeping in mind to ensure you don’t come unstuck.


Firstly, the workability of the smoothing compound will start to reduce if conditions rise to over 20°C, and there will be less


40 | SUBFLOOR PREPARATION


time available to spike roller. Therefore, avoid missing this window by scheduling the task early in the day.


Finally, consider how you store the products before use. For example, avoid leaving liquids in hot vans for extended periods, using warm water from taps, and leaving bags of products in storage where they will absorb heat.


At Bostik, we have a wealth of experience in supplying floor preparation products that enable contractors to install floorcoverings to the highest possible standard.


www.bostik-profloor.co.uk


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