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ON THE FACTORY FLOOR


Sherwin-Williams finds the finish for the rejuvenation of one of Yorkshire’s most prominent manufacturing powerhouses.


Developers of the landmark Copperworks factory building in Leeds chose a new flooring system from Sherwin-Williams to finish its restoration as a modern warehouse facility.


Spanning 24,400m², the concrete floor surface of the 90-year-old former foundry was in varying states of disrepair with several layers of coatings and iron tracks, heavy wear and tear and oil contamination.


Having examined the various challenging environmental issues, Sherwin-Williams’ experts came up with a programme of flooring installation to meet the exacting specifications. This included diamond grinding and shotblasting.


An oil-tolerant primer was applied to prevent delamination and RS Dampshield — a two-component epoxy resin membrane – was used in areas where moisture had been detected.


This was finished with two coats of Resucoat HB, a high-build, low odour, epoxy resin industrial floor coating for high impact and wear resistance. It is extremely hardwearing with a high gloss finish and has strong adhesion onto varied substrates including concrete and appropriate primers. It also comes in a variety of colours.


Matthew Jones, of Jones Hargreaves building consultants who led the project, said: “A solution was required to coat the floor to provide a sound surface which the tenant could keep clean easily. Sherwin-Williams has provided a first-class solution, providing a suitable specification and details of the guarantee within a very short space of time to assist us in meeting the programme to a very high standard.”


The foundry was previously known as the Leeds Copperworks and then Yorkshire Copperworks and has played host to


18 | INDUSTRIAL FLOORING


a number of industrial breakthroughs, as well as royal visits, and at its peak was the workplace of a 5,000 strong workforce before it closed in 1980.


From the invention of the Yorkshire fitting and the supply of materials for shipbuilding repairs in World War I, the Copperworks has played a pivotal role in British industry and history.


Generations of families have worked at the site, seeing the transition through its various names as well as multiple mergers and takeovers since.


The site has played host to a number of industrial breakthroughs, as well as royal visits, and at its peak was one of the largest employers in the region.


In 1930 a works brass band was formed as the Yorkshire Copperworks Band which still exists today as the Yorkshire Imperial Band, or Yorkshire Imps, performing in Middleton Park in recent years.


The old works have been refurbished with buildings re-roofed and re-clad and a modern warehousing and distribution facility of 300,000ft² has been created for owners Towngate plc.


Sherwin-Williams’ high-performance flooring systems are used in diverse industries including food and beverage, pharmaceutical, industrial, retail, commercial and aerospace offering benefits of non-taint, hardwearing, decorative, impact resistance, slip-resistance, abrasion resistant, chemical protection and thermal shock resistance.


Sherwin-Williams Protective & Marine Coatings is based in Bolton, Greater Manchester, from where it develops and manufactures industry-leading products.


https://protectiveemea.sherwin-williams.com/ www.protectiveemea.sherwin-williams.com


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