search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
FOR AQUATIC USE


SOME DOGS ARE NOT DESIGNED


Story and photographs by Anna Cooke W


e all like to think we are the best pet par- ents, doting on our dogs with appointments to the salon for spa groomings, feeding them high-quality food, giving them lots of toys, and providing them with comfy beds,


laps to sit on and lots of love. Safety at home is a top priority for pet parents, inside


and outside. We make sure to always be aware of where our pets are; remembering to never leave them unattended outdoors. Until, for that one split second when we’ve become distracted. Ed and Marsha Droste have two adorable French


Bulldogs, Pete and Shorty. The dogs are named after the restaurant concept, Pete & Shorty’s, co-founded by Ed, an original founder of the original Hooters. The family lives in a beautiful waterfront home with a swimming pool. Having done a lot of research on the Frenchie breed,


the Drostes were well aware of their inability to swim. Their legs are generally too short to effectively doggy paddle. In fact, the heavy-bodied dog with the oversized head does not even float. Experience shows, and stories abound, once Frenchies start sinking, they go all the way, and they won’t be able to swim back to the surface. A French Bulldog Rescue site includes this dire warn-


ing if you’re considering adopting a Frenchie: “You can see your dog fall in the pool from 20 yards away. You run as fast as you can, jump in with all your clothes on, swim to the bottom of the pool, and bring him to the surface all in less than a minute, and you still lose him. Why would you risk it?” There had been close calls around the pool with Pete


and Shorty. Ed worked with them in and around the pool, making sure they knew how to get out should they fall in. The couple took extra precautions with layers of protec- tion methods including the use of lifejackets, never leaving them unattended, and being ever diligent about keeping the barriers up between their house and the pool. “We were obsessed with their safety around the pool,”


said Marsha. Then, it happened.


Continued on the following pageg


56 THE NEW BARKER


www.TheNewBarker.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104