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CHAMBER NEWS


Crime-fighting scheme rolled out in Derbyshire


Businesses across Derbyshire have been urged to work together by joining a scheme that aims to reduce crime and anti-social behaviour as the economic impact of Covid-19 takes hold. Jackie Roberts, manager of the Chamber-run Business Crime Reduction Partnership (BCRP), believes greater collaboration between employers will be crucial to the recovery of town centres. About 100 organisations in


Enterprising Women Awards 2021 launch


During September, we have been busy planning the next chapter of the Enterprising Women Awards as we look to hosting a virtual event to mark the opening of the 2021 awards. On 15 October, we are


delighted to be welcoming back our headline sponsor Futures Housing Group, kicking off the celebration with the group’s chief executive Lindsey Williams opening applications for the Enterprising Women Awards 2021 remotely. The event will take place


online, with additional category sponsors to be announced. We are then opening the floor to allow delegates the opportunity to share their own experiences of our awards, their time in lockdown and even to ask us a question or two. After what has been a tough


few months for many, the awards will be a well-deserved celebration to applaud our members for their determination, passion and achievements. Year on year, the success of


the awards grows and we want 2021 to be our best ceremony yet. The Enterprising Women group is full of talented businesswomen, who we encourage to apply once the process is live.


Best wishes, Jean and Eileen


For more information about the Enterprising Women network, please visit www.emc- dnl.co.uk/enterprisingwomen


24 business networkOctober 2020


Chesterfield, Matlock, Bakewell and Staveley are already signed up to the Partnership, sharing information that will help reduce crime and anti-social behaviour in the towns and surrounding areas. But it is now aiming to roll out


the scheme further afield into the rest of Derbyshire to co-ordinate a more joined-up approach across the county.


‘Any business should look to reduce crime and aim to keep their town or city safe from criminal activity and its knock-on effects’


Jackie said: “We know from past


experience that periods of economic uncertainty can lead to more crime and anti-social behaviour in town and city centres. “So as we come out of lockdown,


the need for crime reduction will become more prevalent. “Having already proven a success


in the towns in which we operate, we now think the time is right to expand the BCRP further into Derbyshire to lead a joined-up approach for reducing crime.”


Derbyshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner Hardyal Dhindsa with members of the Business Crime Reduction Partnership in Chesterfield


The BCRP, one of 200 such


programmes in the country, is funded by both the Chamber and the Derbyshire Police and Crime Commissioner Hardyal Dhindsa. Its remit to reduce crime in the participating towns fits into an overall objective to make them a safer place to work, visit, socialise and shop. Members pay a fee, starting at


£50 for the first year, and benefits include a GDPR-compliant data- sharing system that facilitates direct reporting to the police without the need to use the time- consuming 101 system. Intelligence and crime reports


can be submitted electronically to the police and other BCRP members, who also have access to app and web-based image galleries of people who have been arrested or are known offenders. The British Retail Consortium’s


2020 retail crime survey, published in March just before lockdown, found there were 424 violent or abusive incidents towards staff per day nationally, while businesses lost


BCC director general to step down in 2021


The British Chamber of Commerce (BCC) has announced its director general Dr Adam Marshall (pictured)will leave the organisation in spring 2021. Adam has been in the role for five years and part of the leadership team


at the BCC for almost 12 years. He will leave the group in an enhanced profile and impact, a stable financial position, strong governance and a record number of women among both its executive and non-executive leadership. Working closely with the board, Adam will remain at the helm until 31


March to ensure there is a smooth and effective transition with his successor. He said: “It has been an honour and a privilege to serve this civic-


minded, passionate and purposeful network for nearly 12 years. I feel the time is right to hand over to a great successor, who will continue the fight for our business communities during the period of renewal ahead.”


£770m due to theft and £2.2bn resulting from overall crime. Jackie said: “These figures don’t


take into account other town centre issues that affect businesses, such as anti-social behaviour, robbery, begging, drug dealing and addiction. Businesses of all types will be affected by the fallout from crime, which means any business should look to reduce crime and aim to keep their town or city safe from criminal activity and its knock-on effects.” Derbyshire’s Police and Crime


Commissioner Hardyal Dhindsa said: “The importance of partners working together to make retail areas safer, thereby encouraging footfall and cutting the costs of crime, cannot be overstated. “I’m very pleased to have been


able to support this scheme, which will ultimately benefit shoppers, retail outlets and the hospitality sector.”


Anyone interested in the Derbyshire Business Crime Reduction Partnership can email jackie.roberts@emc-dnl.co.uk


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