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Pg 4 • MAY 2020 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC.


Just Chillin! FOOD, HISTORY & A LITTLE MORE!


TM


Sonoma County, CA. ~ Do you sing in the shower? Hum while cooking up stuff in your kitchen? Do you like to listen to your particularly favor- ite music uninterrupted, perhaps even with your eyes closed? Did you ever enjoy hugging a bowl of future delicious cookies in one arm, while stirring it all up with a wooden spoon— and startling


yourself


that you were humming and doing your version of waltzing around in your kitchen to the ra- dio broadcast of a joyful orchestra blaring forth a Johann Strauss waltz? – Well, I don’t mind admit-


Submit your good news here: upbeat.news@upbeattimes.com Cookin’ to it at Home! by Ellie Schmidt of Sonoma County


ting that I enjoy all of the above. As the old saying goes: “You should try it! You might like it.” Of course, I do not rec- ommend all of the above if any one else hap- pens to be in the kitchen. Might be might y dan - gerous. Or


hey,


maybe fun?


No matter what your BENNETT VALLEY JEWELERS


dio once again seems to be playing a bigger role now than it has for a long time. I have always had a radio on while busy in the kitchen, to enjoy classi- cal music. Lo- cally, because I’m a devout Classical Mu- sic Fan, I en- joy KDFC-FM, a completely listener spon- sored radio broadcast with no commercial ads. But, because you can catch your favorite music on many different stations, there are rich choices. Nostalgia hits hard


Serving Sonoma County Since 1987


2700 Yulupa Ave. ~ Santa Rosa, CA 95405 707-523-1333


bennettvalleyjewelers.com Pg 4 • MAY 2020 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC.


when I think way, way back to the harsh, re- strictive times during what is termed the Great Depression (roughly 1929-1939). Back then, the grisly “economic con- traction,” coupled with the frightful drought of our Great Plains caused


favorite music might be, during these “Stay at home” times, the ra-


a global crisis not unlike our times of conflict be- tween economic prob- lems plus the pan- demic. Since stay


at


home rul- ings are in force, the music source from a radio is a source of solace and com- fort.


What did I hear


in 1930s? I recall, while fiddling with the knob to find a program I liked, there was a lot of political broadcasting about the Social Security Act be- ing passed. My parents would join in listening and they laughed hearing the great humorist Will Rogers poke fun at the world. Benny Goodman was called “The King of Swing.”


The longest running classical music program is the “Saturday Met Op- era broadcasts.” From 1931 to 2020 they now celebrate their 89th year of radio from the Met. Unforgettable, was


our listening to Orson Welles’s Mercury The- atre broadcast of his ad- aptation of H. G. Wells’s novel: “The War of the Worlds.” That was on Halloween, in 1938.


Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated. ~ Confucius continued on page 28


Cheese is the most stolen food in the world. A corned beef


sandwich was smuggled into space.


Froot Loops are all the same flavor.


Expiration dates on bottled water have nothing to do with the water.


Facts & Trivia #1


The early recipes of pound cake called for one pound of butter, one pound of eggs, and one pound of sugar.


Most supermarket wasabi is actually horseradish.


The most expensive pizza in the world costs $12,000 dollars.


Peppers don’t actually burn your mouth. There’s a chemical in chili


peppers called capsaicin that tricks your mouth to feeling like it’s be- ing burned – that’s why spicy food hurts.


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