search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ALL THE LATEST NEWS, VIEWS AND STORIES FROM AROUND YOUR LOCAL AREA:OCTOBER/NOVEMBER


Enjoy beauty treatments in the comfort of your own home by a fully qualified beauty technician.


Specialising in CND Shellac and many other treatments including spray tan, pedicures, manicures, facials,


eyebrow shaping, lash and brow tinting and many more. Please see my Facebook page for special offers. Tel: 07957 261739 * FB: @haileebellx


WANTED! Building land


with or without planning permission


Telephone in confidence 07857 758 143


OASIS AT ALL SAINTS’


Sunday 10th November sees the last Oasis of the year. There will not be one in December. Look out for the notice of the January one. Thank you to all who have supported us during the year. It wouldn’t be the same without you. We do love having you to our thoughtful prayerful singing services.


Hope to see you at 6.00pm and do stay for refreshments afterwards Joan Ingrams


COCKERMOUTH HERITAGE GROUP NEWS WITH GLORIA EDWARDS


For this month’s article, I have been taking a look at a copy of the Cockermouth & District Advertiser for 1947.


In those post-war years, the country was still in the grip of rationing. In the September 26th edition, is an account of Cockermouth’s Detective Laverick’s trip to the Green Dragon in Workington, where he discovered, amongst other items, a 16lb. ham hanging up in their store. The couple running the pub were fined £40 for having obtained food ‘other than by permit voucher’. There was also 91½lb of cooking fat, 31lb of unsalted margarine and 7 dozen eggs, as well as the ham.


Regular food parcels were arriving from Australia to supplement food supplies and raise spirits. In December 1947, the Papcastle Women’s Institute received a large food parcel from Riverton in South Australia, which included dried fruits, jellies, fats and meats, plus all the ingredients for a Christmas cake, including decorations and icing sugar. Mrs. R Jackson of Croft Farm in Papcastle was to make the cake for a children’s party on the 30th December. People’s moods can hardly have been lightened by the accompanying message:


“We have plenty of everything, including luxuries, so do not think we are being self- sacrificing in sending these parcels …”


Displaced persons from Eastern Europe at Moota Camp


We have large stocks of pre-packed coal, logs, sticks and bottled gas


DON'T FORGET YOUR... WINTER WARMERS!


For more information please call 01900 823600 or call in at Fairfield Car Park, South Street, Cockermouth, CA13 9RU


THE CHILDREN'S SOCIETY


A big thank you to all who helped make our Garden Trail so successful. To the gardeners’ who allowed us to include their wonderful gardens and allotments. To all who helped us on the day and to those who visited the gardens. It was a change of season, but we had a lot of positive comments,


enjoying the different gardens and plants on show being the main one. We were really pleased to be able to send £489.00 to The Children's Society.


Jane Proniewicz DOUBLE GLAZING


REPAIR SPECIALIST with over 30 years experience


Locks, Handles, Hinges, Units All at Competitive Rates


Call Ben on: 01900 826572 Mobile: 07522 981 106


WWW.COCKERMOUTHPOST.CO.UK


three times the quantity allowed everyone else. The proposal was to reduce that amount to 2 shillings and 7½ pence.


The Chapel at Moota Camp


Meanwhile, the October 3rd edition of the newspaper reports that Displaced Persons (mostly people from Eastern Europe, displaced by the events of World War II and living at the Moota camp), were getting double the rations of other people living locally: their meat ration of 3 shillings and 6 pence was over


All this was against the backdrop of the most severe winter since 1895, when all building work had to stop for several weeks. There was no unemployment pay, so people were desperate. Soup kitchens were opened and on Sundays, potato-pots were given to those in most desperate need and children had penny dinners in the big room at the


Moota Camp Dining Room


Appletree Hotel (now the Wordsworth Hotel). Down on the banks of the river Cocker, an icehouse was constructed from blocks of ice cut from the river.


This is a good point at which to include a request for information from someone whose grandmother came to Cockermouth during World War II as an evacuee. She was called Nora Erickson and was born in 1933. She stayed with a Mrs. Tyson and was evacuated with


someone called Enid Bole, or possibly Bolt. If this rings any bells with anyone, please get in touch.


01900 823966 • cockermouthheritagegroup@outlook.com www.cockermouthheritagegroup.org.uk


ISSUE 436 | 24 OCTOBER 2019 | 3


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48