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LIVE 24-SEVEN


Songthrush 95


Mistle Thrush


on the bountiful supply of autumn berries, with Hawthorn being a particular favourite. The huge marauding flocks I witnessed in Craig y Cilau, in the Brecon Beacons a couple of autumns back were a sight to behold, giving the impression of out-sized locusts devouring bush after bush of berries. Once the berry supplies are running low, then windfall apples are turned to, illustrating yet another reason why the traditional orchards we are lucky enough to have in Gwent are of such importance for wildlife. When the supply of berries and apples is exhausted, they are not averse to probing the ground for earthworms, however, if the ground becomes frozen or covered in snow they can quickly struggle. When this happens it is common for there to be ‘cold-weather movements’ of birds as they shift even further south and west to escape the freeze and drop down out of the hills to the lowlands. It is when this happens that redwings and fieldfares turn up in our gardens and these normally quite wary and flighty birds can


Blackbird


become quite tame. This allows us to have great views of them, but we must remember that this apparent tameness has come about through desperation and exhaustion so not to disturb. If you can try to put out extra food for them and all the others garden birds.


Those that survive our winter will head back north in spring to breed with our summer visitors hot on their heels to replace them, so life never gets boring!


To find out more about the work of Gwent Wildlife Trust visit www.gwentwildlife.org


LIVE24-SEVEN.COM


GWENT WI LDL I F E TRUST S EASONAL BIRD GUIDE


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