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LIVE 24-SEVEN


‘DOV E S FOR P E ACE ’ FIELDINGS AUCTIONEERS HOST


CHARITY AUCTION IN AID OF UNICEF


With the autumn auction season upon us Fieldings are to hold a unique one-off auction featuring art work from a dazzling array of internationally famous faces from the world of music, stage and screen, sport and art! With one common theme the work couldn’t be more diverse and Fieldings are extremely excited to showcase this wonderful project!


What started out as a fun idea has snowballed in to a sensational collection of drawings, paintings and artworks based on the theme of Peace, with the Dove at the centre, but no one, let alone the project’s founder Dorothy Claxton, could have ever believed it would become the project it is now! To mark the 20th anniversary since that initial request for a Dove doodle, Dorothy is to put all the works up for sale to raise funds for UNICEF. But where did it all begin?


In 1999 Dorothy Claxton was moved by the work of UNICEF and was enthused to do her part in response to the plight of innocent children caught up in violent conflicts and fleeing from war torn countries around the world. The United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) works in over 190 countries and territories to save children’s lives, to defend their rights and to help them fulfil their potential, from early childhood through adolescence.


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Will Farmer is our antiques & collectors expert, he is well known for his resident work on the Antiques Roadshow, he has also written for the popular ‘Miller’s Antique Guide’. Those in the know will have also come across him at ‘Fieldings Auctioneers’. We are delighted that Will writes for Live 24-Seven, he brings with him a wealth of knowledge and expertise.


Dorothy has worked all her life in art education and turned to what she knew best, art, to help to raise funds for such a wonderful cause. She developed a concept to ask well known personalities to draw the international symbol of Peace, and hence DOVES FOR PEACE was born.


The dove has been a symbol of peace and innocence for thousands of years in many different cultures. In ancient Greek mythology it was a symbol of love and the renewal of life and in ancient Japan a dove carrying a sword symbolised the end of war. In 1949 Pablo Picasso made the artwork ‘Dove’ a modern symbol of peace when it was selected as the emblem for the World Peace Congress in 1949. The work entitled ‘Dove’ was used to illustrate the poster of the 1949 Paris Peace Congress and became not only the symbol of the Peace Congresses, but also of the ideals of world Communism.


The Congrès mondial des Partisans de la paix opened in Paris on 20th April. The day before, Picasso’s fourth child was born, who was named Paloma, the Spanish word for ‘dove’. At the 1950 Peace Congress in Sheffield, Picasso was asked to speak and made a brief speech recounting how his father had taught him to paint doves, which he concluded, ‘I stand for life against death; I stand for peace against war.’


The use of this beautiful and internationally recognisable symbol would be a perfect notion for Dorothy to use to tempt future ‘Artists’ to produce their own works. But where to start?


THE ARTISTS INCLUDE… There are over 100 different artworks, to include drawings and sculptures and artists include celebrities, actors, sports personalities, artists, politicians and musicians:


DAVID BOWIE One of the first and most notable ‘Doves for Peace’ artists is the late David


LIVE24-SEVEN.COM


BUYERS GUIDE DOVE S FOR PEACE


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