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READ LOADS MORE ALBUM REVIEWS OVER ON OUR WEBSITE > OUTLINEONLINE.CO.UK


HiiDE BABII


David Auckland 8/10


Margate! Home of Dreamland, the Shell Grotto and, of course the Turner Contemporary Tracey Emin with unmade beds and neon lights remembered. Now, in 2019, we might add another name to the list, that of musician Daisy Warne, aka BABii. The calculated edginess of these nine


slices of shard-like electro pop almost demand something more cutting to match the detached honesty of the material. For this is an album about secrets and hiding, and whilst on first listening you think of artists like FKA Twigs and Grimes, you quickly discover that tracks like PHANTOM, VOLCANO and POiiSON are dealing with feelings of an intensely personal nature. 'I fell in love with a CARNiiVORE', and 'I lost my breath to a PHANTOM ex' leave you in no doubt from where the inspirations are sourced. The sampled sounds of breaking glass on opener SYMMETRii are another clue that this work has been cleverly peppered with allegoric reference.


A brilliantly brave debut.


HOUSE OF SUGAR ALEX G


Callum Gray 8.5/10


Aſter a two-year hiatus following his critically acclaimed album ‘Rocket’, Alex G has returned with a marvellous genre collage. ‘Walk Away’ has a tremendously ethereal


quality, which is retained throughout. ‘Hope’ is the sonic equivalent of a babbling brook, it turns rapidly yet politely. It is charming, interesting and above all an excellent song. The melody is addictive, swaying before ending abruptly. Southern Sky elicits childish playfulness, slipping into a ring- around-the-roses-esque melody. House of Sugar is a smorgasbord of


instrumentation, it feels like Alex G has brought almost everything with strings into the fold. The melodies are creative. The rhythms are oſten multi-layered and complex, yet all come down to a familiar beat. It has a distinctly sunny nostalgic character about it, with both the homely acoustic texture, soſt-vocals and graceful calm.


WHEN I HAVE FEARS THE MURDER CAPITAL


Callum Gray 8/10


The record opens with ‘For Everything’, a violent sonic assault featuring hauntingly gargantuan diving feedback. The drums pummel away, driving a titanic screeching soundscape. Four minutes into Green & Blue, ‘I failed you’ gently rings out to a heavily effected glacier-like guitar, while another 80s chorused guitar slides in, creating a relief from suspense. The whole album combines sounds from


a handful of bands past and present – the melodic guitar work could be drawn in comparison to a great number of diluted post-punk indie bands favouring clean reverb The middle section is truly the calm


before the storm, before long the Dublin punk-rockers propel themselves back into the fray with ‘Feeling Fades’. Followed by ‘Don’t Cling to Life’ which, unfortunately feels a bit too bright, sauntering instead into the domain of indie-pop. In the final track – Love Love Love – The


Murder Capital leave gaps in places a lot of bands can feel uncomfortable doing, yet these empty spaces are what gives their songs power. The production is well done, playing to


every song’s strength – effortlessly creating menace, whether through icy-rattlesnake guitar. ‘When I Have Fears’ is yet another impressive debut from Ireland this year, and here’s to many more.


OUTLINEONLINE.CO.UK / AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 2019 / 29


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