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How do you top a revisionist Nazi-hunting epic in which Hitler gets shot to papier-mâché in a flaming movie theatre? Oh yeah, landing a zeitgeist buddy flick against the backdrop of the Manson killings ought to do the trick.


Join washed up bounty law lead Rick Dalton (DiCaprio) and his aging hippie stunt double Cliff Booth (Pitt) as they wend their extremely well-dressed way through a luxuriant, neon- lit L.A in 1969, from Sunset Strip to Cielo Drive, as they embark on a collision course with fate, history and meta-cultural film-making of the most magnificent order.


Fact Quentin Tarantino stated that the story consists of multiple parallel stories and will be the closest thing to his earlier film Pulp Fiction.


Tarantino can basically have his pick of the lot at this point and it seems that this time he’s delved with both hands into his cinematic curiosity cabinet, sweeping out all the old and new Hollywood gems he could find. With Margot Robbie dazzling as Sharon Tate resurrected, Luke Perry starring in his last ever performance, Mike Moh cropping up as Bruce Lee and a rumour circulating that Jack Nicholson has been lured out of retirement by a Quentin breadcrumb trail of bloody and super-sweary script snippets, OUATIH looks determined to become a cinephile’s walking talking wet dream.


Never shy when it comes to courting controversy, Tarantino, in his 9th and likely


22 / AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 2019 / OUTLINEONLINE.CO.UK


penultimate instalment, promises a homage to the death of 1960’s counter-culture - a snapshot of California dreaming from the crumbling precipice of a fading era - as he irreverently takes a pump-action shotgun to the face of history.


As Quentin’s most non-linear, rambling and episodic narrative since Pulp Fiction, Once Upon A Time promises a heady kaleidoscope of indulgent movie references, more famous faces than a cover of Vanity Fair, an intoxicating discography that would make any world-class disk jockey hang their head in shame, oh and a casual nod to every film he’s ever made on the way, coming in at just under a measly three hours to give you some rambunctious bang for your buck.


Tune in to this, our Summer’s hottest ticket - a one of a kind slice-o’-life, ultra-violent fairy tale and razzle-dazzle passionate affair with a bygone time of decadence and decay in its final ever days.


Words Louis Pigeon-Owen


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