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EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


Opening the door to enhanced efficiency and aesthetics


Aesthetics, longevity and security are all key areas to consider when specifying entrance doors, but with continued increases in energy costs, the role of thermal efficiency is taking precedence in the design process, reports David O’Mara of Hörmann UK


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ntrance doors in the UK must comply with the British Standards Approved Document L1B, which specifies a maximum U-value of 1.8 W/m².K for the whole door element. However, architects can aid their clients in cutting long term heating costs by choosing innovative products that offer thermal efficiencies that are significantly lower than the national maximum. Traditionally, aluminium entrance doors paved the way for security, but lacked


ADF JULY 2019


thermal efficiency when compared to their timber counterparts. However, manufacturers are now developing a new generation of high-insulation entrance doors that offer outstanding energy savings, without compromising on the overall security of the door.


Entrance doors are available which are constructed of high strength aluminium, with a high-tech leaf profile made of a carbon glass-fibre hybrid material, to offer U-values as low as 0.47 W/m².K. This is


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