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VIEWS


23


VIEW POINT


Dr Gavin Dunn of the Chartered Association of Building Engineers (CABE) looks at how the discipline of the ‘the golden thread’ from the Hackitt review is fundamental to ensuring building safety from design through construction to occupation


O


ne of the key issues of the Hackitt review was the ‘golden thread’ of design, construction and


occupation, and what happens to buildings once they are handed over. How do we minimise the gap between these phases and ensure we create buildings that meet client expectations and do what they are supposed to do in terms of operation? The key point Hackitt makes is that the provision of critical technical information to future building users is essential to the safe and efficient ongoing operation of a building. Many decisions made at the construction and design stages fundamentally affect how buildings should be managed and more importantly, how they should be managed during n emergency.


The review also highlighted the complexity of both the construction and procurement processes, and correctly identified the ‘fragmentation’ within the industry. There is a lack of clarity on roles and responsibilities, and ambiguity over where responsibility lies. Those people who are involved at the beginning of a project, whether they are a local authority or a client, are not necessarily there at the end. Therefore, the people who are signing off conditions or substitutions may well be a new team and therefore not privy to the original safety strategy.


Information continuity The original design intent, and the actual information on what has actually been built, is not ending up in the hands of the people who need it in the future in a useable way. It is often the case that building logbooks are not maintained and kept up-to-date. This issue is compounded further if the building changes hands over time, and the critical information needed by key stakeholders to manage an asset


ADF JULY 2019 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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