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INSULATION


99


Acoustic bridges will occur, and sound reduction become ineffective, if the joints between the wall and staircase allow any dirt and material ingress


for example may not protect the joint areas completely, with the result that dirt and plaster can find their way into the gaps, causing acoustic bridges. Other materials may result in lower sound insulation performance, moreover there is often no acoustic validation for on-site solutions. Soft materials have a high risk of creating sound bridges, as stones or construction debris may have been transferred into the gaps. Also, if harder materials are used, such as polystyrene or foam, there is a transmission through the material itself and compliance with even with the minimum requirements is jeopardised. To achieve these with construction site materials, the whole staircase must be free of sound bridges.


Creating an impact sound solution for staircases


An integrated impact sound insulation solution has been developed for all structural subsections on both straight and winding staircases. Known as Tronsole, this system has been designed to facilitate straightforward installation. Pascal Maier, international product manager for Tronsole at Schöck comments: “Good soundproofing is becoming increasingly important in quality construction. Staircases in particular and the elimination of impact sound and acoustic bridges is essential. The system provides standard-compliant soundproofing in apartment blocks and multi-use buildings.” Maier continues: “An individual elastomer support under the stairs is not


ADF FEBRUARY 2019


fixed, and can slip. This can result in more than just the concrete edge breaking due to incorrect support; it also harbours the risk of dirt and gravel getting into the gap between staircase and floor slab or landing. It takes only one piece of gravel to reduce acoustic insulation performance by around 10 dB. By contrast, a system that envelopes the entire staircase minimises the risk of acoustic bridges.”


Seven main product types are mixed and matched to form a fully integrated impact soundproof system, At the system’s heart is an elastomer support, formulated and designed to ensure optimum acoustic insulation and low deflection. Compared with conventional strip supports, it assures an impact sound level difference of approximately 32 dB, which constitutes an improvement of around 10 dB. Acoustic bridges will occur, and the sound reduction become ineffective, if the joints between the staircase wall and the staircase (soffit and landing) allow any dirt and material ingress. A key component of the system is designed to ensure complete soundproofing by totally sealing the joint. The system is suitable for on or offsite construction, and for emergency exits; it also complies with the requirements for fire resistance class R90 (subject to appropriate on-site additional reinforcement of the landing).


Chris Willett is UK managing director at Schöck


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK STAIRWAY TO SILENCE


An integrated impact sound insulation solution has been developed for straight and winding staircases


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