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NEWS


21


The project will “give Taipei the downtown it deserves,” say the architects


for public events, and a variety of other public services. Principal and co-founder of MVRDV, Winy Maas said, “Arriving


at Taipei Central Station is currently an anti-climax. The immediate area does not reveal the metropolitan charms and exciting quality that the Taiwanese metropolis has to offer.” “The Taipei Twin Towers will turn this area into the downtown


that Taipei deserves, with its vibrant mixture of activities matched only by the vibrant collection of facade treatments on the stacked neighbourhood above.”


Public atria are created at the centres of the retail blocks, which allow for a natural ventilation system. Outside, escalators and walkways connect the terraces at high level, and provide alternative access to stores, making a “vertical shopping experience that rewards exploration.” An elevated walkway that connects the station with the surrounding destinations will also become the project’s “spine.” Currently two design variations of this element are possible, said MVRDV: one running straight through the site, and another running close to the facades of the new buildings, connecting with the larger network of escalators and walkways. Maas commented, “We broke down the required programme


into pleasant small blocks that echo the surrounding urban quarters, thus fitting the density fit into its surroundings. People can climb over the blocks to the top – a true vertical village. The space in between allows for social gatherings.” This vertical village approach continues MVRDV’s “investigation”


into the future of high-rise buildings. The firm said: “Whereas traditional skyscraper typologies create a separation between the ground-level public realm and the elevated and isolated world of the building’s interior, the Taipei Twin Towers will allow these two conditions to intertwine.” By extending exterior pedestrian routes over the bottom 20 floors of the building, “the public realm of the city is expanded, while the interior life of the tower is allowed to spread out into its surroundings.” Thanks to the retail blocks’ small size, each need only contain only a small number of tenants – in many cases just a single store. This “opens up the possibility that each block could communicate its unique character through an individual facade.” A number of these facades are also proposed to feature interactive media displays, making the buildings “dynamic hosts” for showing major cultural spectacles, sporting events, as well as advertising. MVRDV is working with CHY Architecture Urban Landscape as


co-architect, landscape designer Topotek1, and consultants Envision Engineering, Arup, RWDI, and Mercury Fire Engineering Consulting.


ADF FEBRUARY 2019 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


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