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PROJECT REPORT: TRANSPORT FACILITIES & PUBLIC REALM


51


© Paul Zanre


© Paul Zanre


which is already used for events, and runs to the waterside. Steel comments: “In a sense, there’s a certain classical element to the building,” citing its exposed steel columns to front and rear. The building frames a small, roughly crescent-shaped plaza to give pedestrians some refuge from the heavy traffic nearby. Designed by the council, it features polished concrete ‘pebbles’ which are proving popular as seating.


Commenting on the newly created public


realm, Steel says, “It was important the facade onto the plaza was of true urban scale, and avoided the ‘flatness’ that is a feature of many modern buildings.” He adds: “The deeply inset bedroom windows, subdivided by columns, creates a kind of giant order that feels appropriate to the status of the building.” These windows also give hotel guests added privacy on the inner curve of the building, preventing views in from other rooms.


The building has glazed corners, butt-jointed windows to the south allowing these hotel rooms fantastic views across the Tay, some being triple glazed to attenuate noise from trains. The north and south elevations are glazed in part – including the cafe space covering the first three levels to the south and the hotel entrance and stairwell facing the town to the north. At night, this provides “a kind of beacon,” says Steel.


ADF FEBRUARY 2019


There is a “conscious difference” between the more transparent lower floors and the more closed, intimate upper hotel floors, accentuated by the fact the building is deeper in plan on the bottom three levels due to these housing a different set of functions. However, to the front, the whole curve is clad in terracotta, bar the very bottom which is in granite to resist damage. The upper stories and end elevations are clad in a mix of curtain walling and anodised aluminium panels, which are acid etched in four different shades and randomly distributed. Terracotta also clads the bottom three storeys to the rear of the building, surrounding a glazed arch mirroring its counterpart to the front, and welcoming passengers ascending via escalators (or accessible lift) from the platform level below. Steel comments on the choice of material: “We were conscious of a desire to pick up on some of the better stone in Dundee, some of the buff colours and lighter colours.”


Interiors Internally, the concourse space is typically uncluttered to allow efficient passenger movement, with the cafe accessed to the left on entering via the main sliding doors, signalled by a piano outside for public use, and a retail unit and ticket office to the right. Passengers then descend to platform level through a newly


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TOP LEFT


Escalator down to platforms from concourse with diagrid rooflight above


TOP RIGHT The concourse features a tensile fabric ceiling


© Paul Zanre


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