search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INSIGHTS SITE LINES


Designing for future workspace


Architect Nick Ridout of Scott Brownrigg says with the way we work changing fast, designers need to answer key questions such as when to retrofit, and how formal spaces need to be


he office market is shifting; users are becoming more demanding of their office spaces. Leases are becoming shorter and more flexible. The way we work has changed dramatically in the last 15 or so years. Emphasis on wellbeing and the positive effect this has on productivity and talent retention is key for businesses seeking to attract and retain the best people. These changing demands are driving a wider range of offers to the commercial office market, with an increasing requirement to provide differentiation.


T


Advances in IT and mobility have resulted in a significant rise in start-ups and small companies seeking more affordable office spaces; happy to compromise on perceived quality of space and set up in less fashionable areas, often former industrial spaces. This, coupled with an increasing emphasis on collaboration and exchange of ideas in lieu of more isolated tasks and cellular, hierarchical organisation of working environments, has led to the trend in less formal office design.


Standard 25 year leases on 1990s building stock are coming to


an end, and this is providing redevelopment opportunities. Back then, a higher level of M&E servicing was the norm, with associated floor-to-floor heights to accommodate additional air distribution. Floor loadings were designed to accommodate significant quantities of heavy paper and servers. Such structural capacity is no longer needed to carry the modern day office and can instead be used as a way of creating additional floor space to make buildings work harder, achieve higher rental values and ultimately become more attractive to potential tenants.


When to retrofit?


Retrofitting can mean a wide range of intrusion levels, from a ‘lick of paint’ to refresh a building and get it back to market, to stripping back to frame, remodelling, re-servicing and extending a building. The level of retrofit will depend on market conditions, investment models, and what product the developer wants to bring to market.


Retrofitting an existing building can have significant benefits as well as some limitations on the final product, so when to retrofit, and when to demolish and re-build? The reality, or course, is that there is no ‘one size fits all’ approach, but below are some of the


ADF FEBRUARY 2019 WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132