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NEWS RESIDENTIAL


Terrace gets ‘two boxes’ extension


The Fragmented House is one of six projects completed by Space Group Architects within the Driffield Road Conservation Area of Tower Hamlets in east London. The “convoluted” Victorian terraced house required “drastic re-shuffling of its functions in order to unlock and add additional space for family of five,” said the firm. With budget constraints in mind,


AVIATION


Fosters collaboration up for Chicago airport terminal


Designs for the new O’Hare Global Terminal and Global Concourse were presented at the Chicago Architecture Centre in January. Following an exhibition of the joint Foster + Partners, Epstein and Moreno proposal, together with the four other entries, which was on display at the Chicago Architecture Centre, the local public were invited to vote for their favourite scheme.


The new terminal will replace the


existing 1960s Terminal 2, “with a cutting-edge global terminal that reflects the legacy of Chicago’s innovation, architecture and diversity.” The joint venture said it has created “a new vision for a gateway to Chicago that captures the city’s progressive spirit and its architectural legacy, while re-thinking the airport terminal for the next generation.” In the design by Foster + Partners, Epstein and Moreno, departing passengers will first encounter the three sweeping arches of the new terminal as they approach, creating a dramatic canopy over the drop-off. The arches then merge into a single curve as they enter the building, “blurring the boundaries between inside and out and allowing the spectacle of the airfield to unfold, recapturing the romance associated with air travel,” said Foster + Partners. The column-free spacious volume is flooded with natural light. Domestic and


ADF FEBRUARY 2019


international arrivals and departures are intelligently planned with direct routes, and every detail is designed “with the passenger experience at its heart.”


The unique roof structure is an emblematic element that binds the entire design together. Using cutting-edge technology, it is supported on its perimeter at just six points, creating a grand unified space that is designed to meet the ever-changing operational demands that are synonymous with airport terminals and new technologies. Norman Foster, founder and executive chairman of Foster + Partners, said: “This project brings two passions together, my personal passion for flight – and my love affair with cities. I remember coming to Chicago as a graduate and being captivated by the energy, the extraordinary location, the music, the culture, and the outdoor sculpture – all of those influences blend together in our proposal.” “In 1991, we revolutionised airport design with Stansted. At O’Hare Global Terminal, we are creating another revolution – an extraordinary shell with a span of 550 feet, with views that create a direct visual relationship with the aircraft and a sense of orientation and drama, a space that truly lifts the spirits. It pushes the limits of technology to create a space that is generous, flexible, and points to the future.”


Space Group Architects decided early on to keep the structural interventions to a minimum and used existing openings as setting out points for new spaces. The architects managed to add a bedroom, bathroom, laundry drying room and a new dining area, plus a new multi-functional lounge. The two levels of ‘boxes’ were clad in


different tones of grey fibre-cement boards, carefully stacked on the rear elevation, which are interrupted by ‘ribbons’ of glass. “The glazing emphasises the three-dimensionality while also allowing for a controlled flow of daylight and still maintaining privacy,” commented the architects. The ground floor also received a new


wall separating the means of escape from the existing living room, “in order to address the Building Control short-comings with regards to the fire strategy,” commented Space Group. However, a sense of openness had been maintained by providing large, pivoted door panels that can be folded away.


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