search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
PROJECT REPORT: RETAIL DEVELOPMENTS


59


The first designs had just one of the


roofs “peeling” out to meet the other, which left a hole in the middle. But this idea was challenged, on the basis that while the aim was to connect them, the buildings also needed to retain their own identity. The next iteration, therefore, was to bring both roofs out and up so that the buildings met in the middle, simultaneously creating a third level. This also raised the height of the building, which sits in a low- lying part of the King’s Cross site and, as Finlay says, “announced it” to the public. “It was totally off people’s radar, because it’s sunken.”


Victorian industrial to 21st century retail


One of the biggest challenges presented by the coal drops was making them suitable for high-end retail, says Green: “They were never envisaged to be that, so there’s a lot that goes into how to get those kind of buildings to work.” For example, the architects were very conscious that the width across a typical shopping environment would usually be 10 to 13 metres – a distance based on how people will interact with the environment and at what distance they’re likely to be drawn into shops. The distance between the coal drops ranges from 26 metres at the northern end to 39 metres at the southern end.


This was a contributing factor to the


studio’s notion that the development needed a heart, and that making bridges between the two wasn’t going to cut it. The brief’s aim to create a ‘destination’, was key to their thinking. “We thought if you just refurbish these buildings and put bridges in, you’re not going to get what you want,” explains Finlay.


ADF FEBRUARY 2019


Naturally with a part-heritage project such as this, the studio were conscious to do as little alternation as possible to these historic structures – especially given the eastern one is Grade II listed. For the most part, the original brickwork remains intact, complete with soot stains and old paintwork. “We’ve tried to keep the slight moodiness,” Finlay summarises. However, various uses and alterations over time meant floor levels were all over the place, and so adjusting those became the biggest change at lower levels. “We had to be able to get the inside level to meet with the outside,” Green explains. As well as the floor level, in some places the sills had to be dropped. Every bay was closely examined by the heritage consult- ants, not only to assess the structural integrity, but also to see where it would or wouldn’t be appropriate to alter it. “There was a lot of going back and forward,” Finlay says. At the end of each building is a large “anchor” unit, where much of the original structure could be left intact, the retail tenants installing stairs and lifts where necessary.


Meeting the challenge With various teams and consultants working on the project, 3D BIM modelling formed a key part of the design process. The basis for these models was formed from a point cloud scan of the building, which was conducted early on. However, with a conscious desire “not to stay in the digital environment”, the studio also produced many physical models to “check scale and materiality”.


Adding an additional level to the buildings presented myriad challenges. Green says that a key aim was the “illusion of the roof being peeled out, and that there


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


TRANSFORMATIVE Replacing the roofs with twisting, curving but still slate-covered structures also created striking interior spaces for retail tenants


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132